LEA 123: Leadership Training – Individualized Problem Solving

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Tyler Dockery specializes in Individualized Problem Solving Strategies
Tyler Dockery specializes in Individualized Problem Solving Strategies

LEA 123: Leadership Training – Individualized Problem Solving Strategies

This leadership session built on the principles presented in both LEA 111 and LEA 112 by exploring how to formulate successful problem solving strategies through the understanding and appreciation of the extrovert/introvert dichotomy.

Our original Presenter: was supposed to be Amanda Sinodis (it was her birthday this week), however, Noah Spencer ended up being one of the presenters for this event (there were two).

This was a great time for me to acknowledge the help Noah Spencer had given me in the hiring process. I took the opportunity to give him the thanks that I felt appropriate, although it probably held little if any meaning in his eyes. Truth be told, that thanks was really all about me. I wanted to tell him that I was thankful, and to be pleased with the deal that I have been given. I think it was taken well, and we shook hands.

This class was really great. It was all about the differences in introverts and extroverts. The class was roughly 20 people, and only 2 were extroverts. It was interesting to hear everyone laying out their Jung Typology sets (I;m an INTJ). ALthough it was fairly lopsided type-wise in the class, I got some really good information.

Many of the problems of an interpersonal nature come from differences and perceived differences in thoughts and actions. This is especially true of introverts and extroverts. The fundamental issues between the two drop down mainly to internalizing vs. externalizing. SOme people think  more before acting, others go with a gut reaction. Many differences can cause feelings of unrest or displeasing behaviors to arise.

examples include:

  • An introvert may wait before taking action, causing others to think they are hesitant or do not agree
  • An extrovert may act on instinct, causing others to feel they are jumping to conclusions which might be untrue
  • An introvert may avoid groups, causing others to feel they are shunning company or feel groups are beneath them
  • Extroverts may blow up when angry or upset
  • Introverts may excuse themselves even when nothing is wrong
  • Extroverts may act on a suggestion without planning how to integrate it into their regime
  • Introverts may carefully plan several actions before beginning a single one, stalling the outcome

During this exercise, we were asked to identify introverts/extroverts based on images alone (couldn’t really do it), and to make up stories based on what they were like based on the headshot photos. We then discussed more ways to discuss passing ideas to introverts and extroverts in order to have the best integration with our teams.

At the end, we had a really fun activity called the introvert/extrovert cocktail. We divided up into groups and were designated either introverts or extroverts and had to attend the short party session by exhibiting the most extreme behavior we could. Everybody had a great time seeing all the extremes crashing into one another or trying to quietly escape. It was a great session.

 

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