LEA115: Habits of Successful Leaders

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Lead115This was hosted by Denise Lorenz and Deb Oronzio

Planning for Results Managing Priorities Creative Problem Solving

In the beginning, we rated ourseles on the 10 habits of successful leaders and the 20 bad habits of leaders. I was fairly happy with my results, but honestly it would take a fair amount of work and adjustment to quash these. If you’re interested in learning where you stand, try visiting our class examples at http://www.slideshare.net/bright9977/10-habits-of-the-great-leader

Part One: Assessing Your Leadership

leadership habits

The training hopes to introduce practical ideas and techniques for short and long term planning with an improved focus on results. We also seek to help define criteria for prioritization of your work and a system for managing to those priorities.
Introduce a five-step, structured process for problem solving in teams or groups.

Wake Tech Mission & Vision

The MISSION of Wake Technical Community College is to improve and enrich lives by meeting the lifelong education, training, and workforce development needs of the communities we serve.

Our VISION is to be a college that exceeds the expectations of our stakeholders for effective lifelong education, training, and workforce development by providing world-class programs and services. Wake Tech will structure its operations, training, and educational programs around the CORE VALUES of accountability, respect, responsibility, critical thinking, communication, and collaboration.

Part Two – Planning, Priorities and Problem Solving

Planning for Results

Types of Planning

  • Planning for Results
  • Strategic Planning in Higher Education
  • Wake Tech Mission and Values
  • Types of Planning
  • Obstacles to Planning
  • Planning for Results

Wake Tech Core Values

Accountability is essential for an environment of learning. Those who are accountable stand by their words and actions, taking full responsibility for what they create and for what they contribute to the community.

Respect is a prerequisite for enhancing learning. Community members who respect themselves and others help create a safe, yet open, climate of learning.

Responsibility is the root of success. Students who assume personal responsibility for their education will reach their goals. Responsible students also make contributions to their communities.

Critical thinking is the fundamental purpose of higher education. The ability to solve problems through the application of the appropriate skills is critical to all disciplines.

Communication is increasingly the key competency for living and working in the information age. Communicating effectively in oral and written forms through traditional and new media is a powerful tool for personal and career success.

Collaboration, by bringing together individual knowledge and talents, creates teams that are greater than the sum of their parts. Such teamwork maximizes benefits to individuals and the community.

Making the Plan Work

Leadership – Defining leadership roles and responsibilities. Creating a commitment to the plan.
Communication – Attention given to each affected group of plan to lessen resistance.
Assessment – Monitor plan’s progress and assess its outcomes.

Plan Process Considerations

  • Create a diverse leadership team to gain variety of perspectives
  • Foster readiness and shared sense of need for change
  • Gain historical perspective of previous planning efforts
  • Anticipate concerns and develop strategies to address them
  • Engage faculty and staff to ensure openness and inclusion
  • Identify needed resources

Obstacles to Planning

  • Lack of Awareness
  • Culture of Immediacy
  • Lack of Initiative
  • Fear Factor
  • “We’ve never done it this way before“
  • “We’ve always done it this way”
  • “What happens if we fail?”

Planning for Results

  • Develop a sense of direction and purpose
  • ID factors that affect the College
  • Understand circumstances contributing to past successes (or failures)
  • Coordinate efforts – include your team
  • Ensure availability of adequate resources
  • Develop “What If” Scenarios
  • Establish Performance Standards
  • Establish priorities

Prioritizing Your Time

A Guide for Prioritizing

Set 3 Most Important Tasks (MITs) for the day. If you could only do three things today, what would I feel the most fulfilled in doing?
Focus on providing value. How much value will this provide me, or someone else?
Think long-term. Will this make a difference a week, month or year from now? Five years?
A Guide for Prioritizing. First things first.
I will focus on completing my most important tasks early in the day so that if my afternoon gets busy, I can still finish the day feeling that I accomplished what I wanted to.
Have a clear vision. Is this activity moving me closer to my vision? Will it make much of a difference tomorrow or next week?

Meeting Management

  • Do you need a meeting?
  • Plan the meeting – Begin with the end in mind.
  • Select the appropriate participants.
  • Distribute agenda and work materials in advance of the meeting.
  • Begin and end the meeting on time.
  • Appoint a facilitator and time-keeper.
  • Designate follow-up actions with due dates.
  • Publish meeting minutes – including action items – within 24 hours.
  • For those with action items, work into priorities matrix.

Structured Problem Solving Process

  • Identify the stakeholders
  • Define the problem
  • Understand the problem
  • Identify solutions
  • Pick a solution
  • Implement the solution
  • Measure the results
  • Revise and repeat
  • Tackling Your Committee “Opportunity”
  • Define the problem.
  • Do you really have enough information for this?
  • Who would you need to involve? (A “committee” isn’t always the best option.)
  • To get creative, you need to get outside of the box – to get out of the box… you need help!
  • What information would you need to collect?
  • What do you already have?
  • What do you need to research / create?
  • Tackling Your Committee “Opportunity”
  • Once you have all the information you need – what possible solutions can you identify?
  • What will they cost?
  • How easy / difficult will they be to implement?
  • What will drive results?
  • Get in the way?
  • Tackling Your Committee “Opportunity”
  • Select a solution – build consensus.
  • How will you measure your results? (If you can’t measure results, how will you know if the problem is fixed?)
  • Plan your implementation:
  • Who needs to be on board?
  • What do they need to know?
  • What needs to be done to support implementation?
  • Implement, measure, evaluate and revisit.

Part Three – Reality

Managing Interruptions

  • The phone
  • The email
  • The “drop-in”
  • Contracts with your “significant others”
  • Boss
  • Colleagues
  • Students
  • Wrap-Up

    As a result of today’s discussion, what will you?

    Start doing?
    Stop doing?
    Change?

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