Microsoft Technology Associate Status in HTML5 Application Development Fundamentals Achieved!

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At 10:00am On 3/22/18 I attended the Certiport certification lab presented by Certiport at the 2018 NCCIA Conference located at Asheville-Buncomb Technical Community College in Asheville, NC.

Tyler Dockery Achieves MTA status in HTML5 Application Development Fundamentals

MTA status in HTML5 Application Development Fundamentals Achieved!

I chose to attempt this exam because of my knowledge of core HTML5 client application development skills that will run on today’s touch-enabled devices (PCs, tablets, and phones). Although HTML is often thought of as a web technology that is rendered in a browser to produce a UI, this exam seemed to focus on using HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript to develop client applications. I felt confident to take this exam, because I had a solid foundation of knowledge of HTML5 & CSS3, but expected some issues with JavaScript. Since I teach and have hands-on experience with these technologies and since I’ve been working in the field of web design since 2000, I felt I’d have a fair handle on this. While I did not have a ton of experience with Microsoft Visual Studio, I felt I could do well.

The Official Breakdown of Subject Matter

Microsoft’s official exam page for this test: MTA EXAM 98-375 outlines the following fundamentals will possibly be covered:

Manage the application life cycle (20–25%)

  • Understand the platform fundamentals
    • Packaging and the runtime environment: app package, app container, credentials/permission sets, host process, leverage existing HTML5 skills and content for slate/tablet applications
  • Manage the state of an application
    • Manage session state, app state, and persist state information; understand states of an application; understand the differences between local and session storage
  • Debug and test an HTML5-based, touch-enabled application
    • Touch gestures; understand which gestures you test on a device

Preparation resources

Build the user interface (UI) by using HTML5 (25–30%)

  • Choose and configure HTML5 tags to display text content
  • Choose and configure HTML5 tags to display graphics
    • When, why, and how to use Canvas; when, why, and how to use scalable vector graphics (SVG)
  • Choose and configure HTML5 tags to play media
    • Video and audio tags
  • Choose and configure HTML5 tags to organize content and forms
    • Tables, lists, sections; semantic HTML
  • Choose and configure HTML5 tags for input and validation

Preparation resources

Format the user interface by using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) (20–25%)

  • Understand the core CSS concepts
    • Separate presentation from content (create content with HTML and style content with CSS); manage content flow (inline versus block flow); manage positioning of individual elements( float versus absolute positioning); manage content overflow (scrolling, visible, and hidden); basic CSS styling
  • Arrange UI content by using CSS
    • Use flexible box and grid layouts to establish content alignment, direction, and orientation; proportional scaling and use of “free scale” for elements within a flexible box or grid; order and arrange content; concepts for using flex box for simple layouts and grid for complex layouts; grid content properties for rows and columns; use application templates
  • Manage the flow of text content by using CSS
    • Regions and using regions to flow text content between multiple sections (content source, content container, dynamic flow, flow-into, flow-from, msRegionUpdate, msRegionOverflow, msGetRegionContent); columns and hyphenation and using these CSS settings to optimize the readability of text; use “positioned floats” to create text flow around a floating object
  • Manage the graphical interface by using CSS
    • Graphics effects (rounded corners, shadows, transparency, background gradients, typography, and Web Open Font Format); two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) transformations (translate, scale, rotate, skew, and 3-D perspective transitions and animations); SVG filter effects; Canvas

Preparation resources

Code by using JavaScript (30–35%)

  • Manage and maintain JavaScript
    • Create and use functions; jQuery and other third-party libraries
  • Update the UI by using JavaScript
    • Locate/access elements; listen and respond to events; show and hide elements; update the content of elements; add elements
  • Code animations by using JavaScript
    • Use animation; manipulate the canvas; work with images, shapes, and other graphics
  • Access data access by using JavaScript
    • Send and receive data; transmit complex objects and parsing; load and save files; App Cache; datatypes; forms; cookies; localStorage
  • Respond to the touch interface
    • Gestures, how to capture and respond to gestures
  • Code additional HTML5 APIs
    • GeoLocation, Web Workers, WebSocket; File API
  • Access device and operating system resources
    • In- memory resources, such as contact lists and calendar; hardware capabilities, such as GPS, accelerometer, and camera

Conclusion

All in all, this test was not bad, but perhaps a little more vigorous than expected. The materials covered had a good amount of in-depth knowledge requirement, and while I suffered a bit with the knowledge of JavaScript and managing session states of the application, I was able to break through with a score in the mid 900s. It was a good challenge, and I felt it will be helpful to me in the long run.

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