business

Diploma in Web Business Development and Marketing Acheived through Alison.com!

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On May 4th, 2015 I achieved the Diploma in Social Media Marketing offered by Alison.com

Diploma in Web Business Development and Marketing

Alison.com — Diploma in Web Business Development and Marketing Achieved!

This coursework was completed over a few days of intense study. Having a business presence on the Internet has become a necessity in today’s world. This diploma course guided me through the initial steps of setting up an online business, from choosing a web hosting account for your site through registering your domain name. The course then explored some of the essential tools in building a working business website, including HTML, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), and Adobe Dreamweaver. Also covered was information related to affiliate and e-mail marketing, as well as the use of social media marketing to help build your business. The Diploma in Web Business Development and Marketing can be seen as ideal for anyone who wants to set up a Web business but feels they need more guidance on the required skills, or for those with a desire to further their understanding of how online businesses work.

Upon completion of this course I have a greater grasp on the abilities of creating a fully functioning business website. I also feel my understanding of web design concepts such as domain name, hosting, nameservers and web editors has improved significantly. I have gained a good knowledge of images, text and the color aspects within a website, and I know how to publish to online hosting companies. I understand HTML, Cascading Style Sheets, Dreamweaver and how to index my business website successfully. I have learned of different ways to make money from an existing website, and how not to overdo it. I fell I know how to use autoresponders to automatically answer emails, and I know how to create confirmation emails and messages in AWeber. This course has introduced me to affiliate marketing and showed me how to increase traffic to my and my clients’ websites.

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ECGC: What Makes You Think YOU Know What A Leader Is?

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So you think YOU know what makes a great leader?!?

Went to the East Coast Gaming Conference Session: What makes you think YOU know what a leader is? as presented by Keith Fuller

In this lecture, Keith Fuller talked about leadership and what some of the qualities of good leaders were, and what was the major roadblock in the industry as far as leadership goes. He began by letting us know what his expectations of us for the talk were: that we would care , that we would participate, and that we would focus.

Leaders set the expectations for those they lead. And a leader, by definition, is responsible for the behavior, tasks, work performance, and development of one or more people whom they manage. The Jetsons boss is NOT leadership.

Leaders watch the quality of your work, and put you where you’ll be best used. A good leader makes you want to show up! The best leaders are approachable, and knows you as a person!

Leaders should not be pulled from a hat. “working ok” is not the same as innovating and excelling. Work should be lead to be efficient, not a “churn and burn” prfoile, because time you are spending at work is not time with the ones you love.

Quality of leadership can be most accurately seen through employee engagement. When and employee cares and is engaged, they work harder. When they are disengaged, they cost you money and productivity.

Quality of work as measured by the happiness of the employee can be directly noted through 2 main objectives: Their relationship with their immediate supervisor, and their belief in senior leadership. More often than not, you don’t quit a company, you quit a boss.

Consider reading:  “First, break all the rules” by Buckingham and Coffman.

If stuck down into  two main points from these hundreds of interviews:

  1. First, treat each employee as a person- know things about them and care about them
  2. Secondly, Don’t make leadership the default career path- great skills do not always translate into leadership, not everyone wants to become a leader.

Communicate, Relate, and Motivate.

Consider reading: “12 – The elements of great managing” wagner and karter

Good leaders have consistently good social skills, are impactful, value people, and objectively improves the business- doing so by supporting the people (arguably the most important part [supporting the people] of the group)

Biggest obstacle to quality leadership: the idea and pat response “We’re good.” (you are fooling yourself). Poor leaders and organizations that sponsor poor leadership feel they have no need to focus on leadership or improving performance.

 

Here was a good exercise:

You will get points for your organization (0-5) based on the following questions, Yes or No, 1pt a piece:
—————————————–

  1. You’re asked to give feedback about lead?
  2. Does everyone get regular 1:1 meetings?
  3. Performance review more than 1/year?
  4. Specific training in leadership skills?
  5. Does lead ask “how can I help you?”

 

Are you willing to give your score and NAME your company out loud? Some were willing to give their score out loud (About half). However, when they were asked if they were will to give their company name, it dropped to 4 individuals.
Problem: you are not willing to discuss this and name this in public.

 

What makes you think you know what a leader is? People are more open and will talk about taking notes in meetings, but NOT about what makes a leader.

WHY? Well, this could be a reputation issue that stops you from getting hired in the future. Many people are worried that the proud nail gets knocked down. What if you are the leader? Are you prepared to self-identify as a bad leader or to ask for help? We should encourage people to ask questions! Getting up to complain on a Soap Box is a bad idea, a 1:1 meeting is the right way.

ECGC: Gamified Talent Management: Using RPG design to motivate employees and redefine work

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Gamification and Leadership

Today at ECGC (The East Coast Gaming Conference), I attending a leadership training seminar: Gamified Talent Management: Using RPG design to motivate employees and redefine work, a lecture by IBM guru Phaedra Boinodiris. This was really fantastic, and should fit nicely with the classroom gamification that I’d like to see in some of our flagging classes. Phaedra Boinodiris identified 4 major attributes of using gamification to find and motivate successful employees:

  1. Cognitive stability
  2. Cognitive complexity
  3. motor-impusivity
  4. establishes a baseline

She then demonstrated a game used for potential employees, a game in which the user built a structure with spots and lines to reach a given point. This could then be used with responsive software to determine some of the cognitive qualities of the individual to help with the onboarding process. She further showed some proprietary software (darnit!) which could be used to chart an individual’s current state and progress in a gamification environment: Nick’s portal environment result from data showing changes and adjustment over time.

Using their previous data as well as the results of the employee profile and reviews, a composite was created similarly to a character sheet– showing calculated mentor matches (along with that mentor employee’s contact information, job matches and suggested promotion track to achieve it, how that employee ranked against others in the industry, how that employee was perceived by their peers, how the current marketplace is embracing their recognized skillsets, an employee assessment, and list of training or certifications suggested for the employee.

Upon my request, Ms. Boinodiris would not reveal information about IBM’s proprietary software. 😦

Questions posed by the leaders using this software required the team to be evaluated as a group. Once all members had taken the assessment, a team could further be assessed, posing questions based upon the team performance in addition to the qualities shown by the team:

  • “To be good at my job, what paths need to be completed?”
  • “What training needs to be completed by our current team?”
  • “What training might need to be required of new or potential team members?”
  • “How many goals are being completed within the group?”
  • “What is it about the ‘class’ of employee that makes this optimal or in need to accomplish our team or individual goals?”

Based on results of these tests and questions, what kind of employees are they? Could you give them designations such as hunter, farmer, leader, etc.? After a class designation has been properly identified, can you change or adjust these designations to make your team the team you desire or the team numbers show is best suited for a particular task?

Once backed up with data, adjustments to your staff’s ‘class’ could be made by sending them ‘quests’ perhaps once per day or week. These quest tasks would slowly evolve the thinking of the team or team members, so that training is no longer siloed. For instance, you might recognize ‘Hunter’ employees as those who track down new, effective leads. ‘Farmers’ on the other hand, might be constantly revisiting old leads to grow new business in already fertile ground. You might assign hunters to revisit ‘old hunting grounds’ once a day and slowly evolve their systems. Farmers on the other hand, might strike out into leads on ‘newly forested areas’ where they can begin relationships and begin a new harvesting in new areas.

By removing the siloed training, you make continual training something that is both approachable and achievable. Also, it CAN become fun. However, you must find ways to provide tailored content to make sure your employees know what they need to do, or show them how they can improve.

It is vitally important to remember: As far as gamification goes, if you’re spending a majority of your time at the beginning determining what motivates your audience, you are doing it wrong.

When adding gamification to your school, workplace, etc, you must avoid the ‘chocolate covered brocoli’ – adding a small benefit to something which your population already hates. A badge alone will NOT motivate the students or employees anymore than covering something they don’t want with chocolate.

The Multiplayer Classroom by Sheldon Lee
The Multiplayer Classroom by Sheldon Lee

Consider reading The Multiplayer Classroom by Sheldon Lee. (I spoke with Sheldon Lee the author during a conference call last week. This was great timing!)

seriousgames_book
Serious Games for Business by Phaedra Boinodiris

Also consider reading Serious Games for Business by Phaedra Boinodiris

 

I felt this was a great presentation, and I learned a lot that I felt would be helpful in methods of leadership! Tell me what you think!

Software Business Analysis Certification Achieved!

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Having come from a background in project management, building whitepapers and presentations for Business Analysis and Software Development Life Cycle collateral through ASPE, and working in the field has really prepped me pretty well for this designation. With only a few days of mior enrichment and study, I was able to achieve this certification with only 30 minutes of the 40 minutes allowed through BrainBench testing.

softwarebusinessanalysis

Business Communication Certification Achieved!

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Business Communication certification is one of three certifications I a working on at this time… and it will be the last time I do this again- its just too much work to study for so many and still pass! Business Communications is a bit of a no-brainer. Just doing the right, professional thing without acting like a jerk, breaking a contract, or breaking the law is all it really takes. Testing 3 examinations in one day… whew! BrainBench, what was I thinking?

businesscommunication

Business Math Certification achieved!

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Today, I completed my training by achieving a certification in Business Math through Brainbench.com . This is one of two training subjects I am currently working on. Honestly, some of this was new to me, but a lot of this was old news. I busted out my TI-81 to break through this examination… Only to be laughed at by the programming crew.

Apparently the TI-81 by Texas Instruments no longer cuts the mustard. Which is sad really. I used my TI-81 all through high school to randomly generate AD&D characters. Now, its just laughable. Oh well. Business math is good… well, for business really.

Tyler Dockery achieved a certification in business math from brainbench.com
Tyler Dockery achieved a certification in business math from brainbench.com

Capstone Courses Roundtable with Walter Rotenberry

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As part of Wake Tech Community College’s professional development seminar, I attended the Capstone Course Roundtable presented by Walter Rotenberry. Walter Rotenberry is the lead for Wake Tech’s SGD department (simulation and video game development).

In the roundtable discussion, Rotenberry laid out his procedure for a capstone course, which I have vaguely outlined below:

  1. Establish the course as a capstone for your program. Inform students prior to entering and upon their first day in the class the details involved with the planned courses of action. Include all expectations, all contingencies, the level of quality required, and how their potential employment may be affected by their level of commitment. Remind them that they will get out of the course whatever they put into it.
  2. Set a final date for presentation. Plan that date and make sure that the course centers around the expectations required on that date.
  3. Focus on what is achievable. Students in Rotenberry’s class presented all their materials to the class in their first week, each choosing their best project to work with, fleshing it out over time to a perfect, finished project to present.
  4. Involve the community. Rotenberry contacted his closest contemporaries at surrounding colleges (in his case, NCSU and their graduate program in Game Development) and had a few joint sessions in which his team and their team could exchange ideas, discuss current projects, and discuss current topics, trends, and ideas in the industry. This was instrumental in achieving a program in which questions would be posed, answered, and attended to BEFORE presentation
  5. Pitch your programs to the best in the business. OK, we presented to CEOs and presidents of video game companies in our area, Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill. Walter Rotenbery lined up the individuals and set their dates to attend, reminding them prior to the festivities, and following up with each one.
  6. Make an event of it. Students came prepared to discuss their work, networked with the individuals present and enjoyed snacks. After a short time had passed, each student presented their projects to the group, and in some cases individual computers were opened so that industry folk could try out each game on their own.
  7. Don’t let the music stop. Walter’s students passed out business cards and links to online portfolios and games. Students followed up with individuals, and several made appointments to meet with industry designers. Several employment opportunities came out of the presentations, and it has become a permanent addition to the SGD (simulation and game development) track.

In attending this training, I could clearly see how our Graphic Design IV or our Portfolio classes could easily become capstone courses. Portfolio could easily transition to involvement with local organizations such as AIGA here in Raleigh, NC or TIMA (triangle interactive Media Association). Graphic Design IV could easily ally with the Addy Awards or with GDUSA and other magazine contests. I look forward to discussing this with Damu Murray, Woody Hayes, and Marsha Mills.