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Alison.com — Diploma in Web Design Achieved!

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On October 27th, 2014 I completed the Diploma in Web Design provided by Alison.com

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Alison.com — Diploma in Web Design Achieved!

This coursework was completed over several weeks. This course goes beyond knowing how to create a HTML page and add content, title, entities, anchor tags, encompassing inserting images, present tags, links, tables, lists and uploading web pages. Coursework included a strong understanding and demonstration of the meaning of inheritance, cascade, pseudoclasses, pseudoelements and selectors … the concepts that are commonly used in web pages.

This required the demonstrated familiarity with using font, background styles and style sheets. This course help you to use Dreamweaver to create a website with HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Flash. It requires the understanding of naming conventions, index files, welcome screens, landing pages, GUI and many more settings that are extremely useful when creating a website successfully. This course also required an understanding of advanced features such as CSS structures, embedded style sheets and much more. Final requirements demand a knowledge of how a web page works as well as a deep knowledge of hosting, domain names and nameservers.

This coursework was originally based on Russell Stannard’s teaching and research experience – and the feedback of his many thousands of students.

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GDA Lecture: Responsive Web Design, a Hands-on Approach

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On Wednesday, February 13th, Tyler Dockery gave an hour-long discussion and hands-on training on responsive web design to the FDA.
Learn about responsive web design with Tyler Dockery

GDA Lecture: Responsive Web Design, a Hands-on Approach

The talk outlined the basics of responsive design, how it differed from adaptive design, and was concluded with a hands-on demonstration in which students could create their own responsive page from a template [ code provided below ].

The Mac Lab was filled and several students remained without computers to discuss the materials and observe the lecture. Q&A after the session covered numerous topics, such as how to use media calls in CSS to reconfigure your responsive pages, and how to organize your content for mobile devices.

He provided two files for the discussion:

First, a word document outlining the basics of responsive design, and giving some great links to websites which students can use to learn more of responsive design basics. The DocX can be downloaded below:

Responsive Discussion Document

Second, a Dreamweaver file with a basic website already coded. Additional CSS has been added BELOW the HTML which will make the page adapt if the screen size becomes 600px or smaller. Cut the commented CSS and add it within the bottom of the <style> tag.

 As this version of wordpress will NOT allow .html files to be uploaded, AND .zip files with .html files insider are also banned, the entire source code will be posted below for those interested.


<html><head><title>Responsive</title>
<style>
body {
background-color:grey;
width: 1024px;
}
.container {
width: 93.75%; /* 960 / 1024 = 93.75% */
height:auto;
margin: 0px auto;
background-color: white;
}
.head {
width: 100%; /* 100% */
height:80px;
background-color: lightgray;
}
.nav {
width: 31.25%; /* 300 / 960 = 31.25% */
height: auto;
float: left;
}
.nav a {
display:block;
}
.content {
width: 66.66666667%; /* 640 / 960 = 66.6666666666667% */
margin-left: 10px;
margin-right:10px;
background-color: lightblue;
height:auto%;
float:right;
}
.footer {
width: 100%; /* 100% */
background-color: pink;
height:80px;
clear: both;
}/* Media Screens Below */</style>
</head><body>
<div class=”container”>
<div class=”head”></div>
<div class=”nav”>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
</div>
<div class=”content”>Whole biggity-bunch of content</div>
<div class=”footer”></div>
</div><!–@media (max-width:600px) {
.nav, .content {
float: none;
width: 100%;
Height: auto;
clear:both;
margin: none;
}
.nav a {
float: left;
margin-right: 10px;
display: inline;
}}
–>
</body></html>

If you’re interested in learning more about Responsive Web Design, please feel free to come and visit with me in my office, 321C in the ETB building. If you enjoyed this or any presentations, please let us know and let us know what you’d like us to present on in the future!

CSS3 Certification Acheived!

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CSS3 certification is one of three certifications I a working on at this time… and it will be the last time I do this again- its just too much work to study for so many and still pass! I have been using CSS in my web design since the year 2000, and I must say that I see some great potential for typography on the web with this newer version. Shadows, rounded corners, I think this stuff is gonna be great! So now, when will IE step up to the plate and allow it to REALLY WORK?? Testing 3 examinations in one day… whew! BrainBench, what was I thinking?

css3

HTML5 Certification Achieved!

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I learned HTML initially in East Carolina University (ECU) and University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), emerging in 1994 with a minor smattering of understanding. In 2000, I took classes at the University of Georgia (UGA) to get HTML and CSS firmly under my belt. HTML5 is a new and emerging standard for web designer. Since I teach a little of this, my HTML5 learning has all been self-taught. Getting this certification is a reflection of study and understanding of the newest upgrade to HTML. So, I determined to get my certifications with BrainBench

html5

HTML5 Certification Achieved!

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HTML5 Certification Achieved!

My training in HTML started in 1996. Stop laughing. I didn’t use it much, finding it clunky and difficult to work with. Programs like Web Warrior used some of the first WYSIWYG interfaces, but their setup was basically put together to show you what you had done, rather than allow you to design visually. Later, in 2000 I got to know Macromedia Dreamweaver 2.0 and Adobe Golive, finding GoLive to be the better of the two. That said, I took training in Macromedia Dreamweaver to get to know it better when receiving my certification in Web Design from the University of Georgia (UGA). In all honesty, I used Adobe GoLive more often, because I simply couldn’t afford a full working version of Macromedia Dreamweaver until about 2005.

Well, a lot has changed between 2012 and 2005. HTML had upgraded to HTML5 some time ago, but implementation of it is still spotty at best. That said, we have classes that teach HTML5 and my grasp on the new items such as sections, articles, headers, footers, HTML5 video and HTML5 audio were tenuous at best. This will only become more visible, more popular, and more widespread as time goes on.

As such, I had decided I would spend some time learning about HTML5 over the last few weeks, and I felt my grasp on this was good enough to seek certification. I’m glad I achieved this certification in HTML5, but I’m more glad that I understand the core concepts and specifics about this new coding style.

Tyler Dockery is certified in HTML5 coding through Brainbench.com
Tyler Dockery is certified in HTML5 coding through Brainbench.com

BFA Design from UNC-G!

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At 6pm On December 18th, 1998 I attended the 1998 Winter Commencement Ceremonies presented by The University of North Carolina at Greensboro at the Greensboro Convention Center in Greensboro, NC.

Received my BFA in Design from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro!

Tyler Dockery attended UNC-G, receiving his BFA in Design in 1998
Tyler Dockery attended UNC-G, receiving his BFA in Design in 1998

Today I received my Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Design with a specialization in Graphic Design and Mutlimedia. Hooray!

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is the highest undergraduate degree that you can receive in the arts, with the Bachelor of Arts as a lesser degree requiring no foreign language or upper-tier courses. In short:

How Fine Arts Degrees Stack Up

Here is the breakdown of visual arts to liberal arts credits that you will encounter in a BFA or BA program:

  • Bachelor of Fine Arts: A BFA requires that approximately two thirds of the course work focus on the creation and study of visual arts, and one third of the course work focus on liberal arts (history, literature, psychology, etc.).
  • Bachelor of Arts: For a BA, the course work ratios are flipped, with a two thirds focus on liberal arts and one third focus on visual arts.

These ratios hold true across all establishments of higher learning. The type of degree, not the institution, determines the amount of visual arts to liberal arts you will study.

Tyler Dockery Attended UNC-G (new logo shown) receiving a BFA in Design in 1998
Tyler Dockery Attended UNC-G (new logo shown) receiving a BFA in Design in 1998

I chose to take the BFA degree track in design because I want to teach graphic design at the collegiate or university level. To do this, I would have to really get into the field and get to know all facets of design. The BFA program at UNC-G  ( http://www.uncg.edu will open in another window) has a focus on both the traditional design methodologies such as drawing, sculpture, color theory, painting, etc., coupled with an emphasis on software and multimedia design. This dual-emphasis on the old and the new will really give me a boost in the workplace (hoping).

 

Software I learned in school

  • Adobe Photoshop 3.0
  • Adobe Illustrator 2.0
  • Adobe Premiere
  • Adobe Pagemaker
  • Quark XPress
  • Hypercard
  • Supercard
  • Aldus Freehand 5.0
  • Macromedia Flash 2.0
  • Macromedia Director
  • Some HTML

Where did you go to school, and what did you learn? Let me know in the comments area!