leadership

LEA115: Habits of Successful Leaders

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Lead115This was hosted by Denise Lorenz and Deb Oronzio

Planning for Results Managing Priorities Creative Problem Solving

In the beginning, we rated ourseles on the 10 habits of successful leaders and the 20 bad habits of leaders. I was fairly happy with my results, but honestly it would take a fair amount of work and adjustment to quash these. If you’re interested in learning where you stand, try visiting our class examples at http://www.slideshare.net/bright9977/10-habits-of-the-great-leader

Part One: Assessing Your Leadership

leadership habits

The training hopes to introduce practical ideas and techniques for short and long term planning with an improved focus on results. We also seek to help define criteria for prioritization of your work and a system for managing to those priorities.
Introduce a five-step, structured process for problem solving in teams or groups.

Wake Tech Mission & Vision

The MISSION of Wake Technical Community College is to improve and enrich lives by meeting the lifelong education, training, and workforce development needs of the communities we serve.

Our VISION is to be a college that exceeds the expectations of our stakeholders for effective lifelong education, training, and workforce development by providing world-class programs and services. Wake Tech will structure its operations, training, and educational programs around the CORE VALUES of accountability, respect, responsibility, critical thinking, communication, and collaboration.

Part Two – Planning, Priorities and Problem Solving

Planning for Results

Types of Planning

  • Planning for Results
  • Strategic Planning in Higher Education
  • Wake Tech Mission and Values
  • Types of Planning
  • Obstacles to Planning
  • Planning for Results

Wake Tech Core Values

Accountability is essential for an environment of learning. Those who are accountable stand by their words and actions, taking full responsibility for what they create and for what they contribute to the community.

Respect is a prerequisite for enhancing learning. Community members who respect themselves and others help create a safe, yet open, climate of learning.

Responsibility is the root of success. Students who assume personal responsibility for their education will reach their goals. Responsible students also make contributions to their communities.

Critical thinking is the fundamental purpose of higher education. The ability to solve problems through the application of the appropriate skills is critical to all disciplines.

Communication is increasingly the key competency for living and working in the information age. Communicating effectively in oral and written forms through traditional and new media is a powerful tool for personal and career success.

Collaboration, by bringing together individual knowledge and talents, creates teams that are greater than the sum of their parts. Such teamwork maximizes benefits to individuals and the community.

Making the Plan Work

Leadership – Defining leadership roles and responsibilities. Creating a commitment to the plan.
Communication – Attention given to each affected group of plan to lessen resistance.
Assessment – Monitor plan’s progress and assess its outcomes.

Plan Process Considerations

  • Create a diverse leadership team to gain variety of perspectives
  • Foster readiness and shared sense of need for change
  • Gain historical perspective of previous planning efforts
  • Anticipate concerns and develop strategies to address them
  • Engage faculty and staff to ensure openness and inclusion
  • Identify needed resources

Obstacles to Planning

  • Lack of Awareness
  • Culture of Immediacy
  • Lack of Initiative
  • Fear Factor
  • “We’ve never done it this way before“
  • “We’ve always done it this way”
  • “What happens if we fail?”

Planning for Results

  • Develop a sense of direction and purpose
  • ID factors that affect the College
  • Understand circumstances contributing to past successes (or failures)
  • Coordinate efforts – include your team
  • Ensure availability of adequate resources
  • Develop “What If” Scenarios
  • Establish Performance Standards
  • Establish priorities

Prioritizing Your Time

A Guide for Prioritizing

Set 3 Most Important Tasks (MITs) for the day. If you could only do three things today, what would I feel the most fulfilled in doing?
Focus on providing value. How much value will this provide me, or someone else?
Think long-term. Will this make a difference a week, month or year from now? Five years?
A Guide for Prioritizing. First things first.
I will focus on completing my most important tasks early in the day so that if my afternoon gets busy, I can still finish the day feeling that I accomplished what I wanted to.
Have a clear vision. Is this activity moving me closer to my vision? Will it make much of a difference tomorrow or next week?

Meeting Management

  • Do you need a meeting?
  • Plan the meeting – Begin with the end in mind.
  • Select the appropriate participants.
  • Distribute agenda and work materials in advance of the meeting.
  • Begin and end the meeting on time.
  • Appoint a facilitator and time-keeper.
  • Designate follow-up actions with due dates.
  • Publish meeting minutes – including action items – within 24 hours.
  • For those with action items, work into priorities matrix.

Structured Problem Solving Process

  • Identify the stakeholders
  • Define the problem
  • Understand the problem
  • Identify solutions
  • Pick a solution
  • Implement the solution
  • Measure the results
  • Revise and repeat
  • Tackling Your Committee “Opportunity”
  • Define the problem.
  • Do you really have enough information for this?
  • Who would you need to involve? (A “committee” isn’t always the best option.)
  • To get creative, you need to get outside of the box – to get out of the box… you need help!
  • What information would you need to collect?
  • What do you already have?
  • What do you need to research / create?
  • Tackling Your Committee “Opportunity”
  • Once you have all the information you need – what possible solutions can you identify?
  • What will they cost?
  • How easy / difficult will they be to implement?
  • What will drive results?
  • Get in the way?
  • Tackling Your Committee “Opportunity”
  • Select a solution – build consensus.
  • How will you measure your results? (If you can’t measure results, how will you know if the problem is fixed?)
  • Plan your implementation:
  • Who needs to be on board?
  • What do they need to know?
  • What needs to be done to support implementation?
  • Implement, measure, evaluate and revisit.

Part Three – Reality

Managing Interruptions

  • The phone
  • The email
  • The “drop-in”
  • Contracts with your “significant others”
  • Boss
  • Colleagues
  • Students
  • Wrap-Up

    As a result of today’s discussion, what will you?

    Start doing?
    Stop doing?
    Change?

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Monday Morning Leadership

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leaves
Monday Morning Leadership is a book by David Cottrell about leading your team, cutting out the non-important things in your daily routine, and doing the right thing. I was given this book by Chris Knotts, Director of Enterprise Marketing at ASPE, Inc, and old friend of mine even before I took on a role at Knotts and Associates.

This book was an excellent read, outlining multiple ideas of leadership in 8 short sessions. It was very interesting to see the ideas represented in this book when looking back at my leadership training in the past (most recently the word “pity party” used in the ECGC leadership sessions. (you can choose leadership or ECGC from the tags menu to access all leadership training and ECGC articles at any time  🙂  ).

One of the most important things I took away from this book was the idea that you need to keep the Main Thing The Main Thing. And, surprisingly, the main thing for Wake Tech, the college I teach at, is 3 things:

  1. Provide the best, most comprehensive, and excellent programs that we can
  2. Provide our Students, Faculty, and Staff with the tools they need to succeed and excel
  3. Provide educated, trained individuals into the local community workforce

If we aren’t doing the first, we can hardly be doing the second. If we aren’t doing the second, there is no way we are doing the third.

I have actually read this book through twice, and I think I’ll read it again. Strongest revelation I found in this book: Being a leader is as far above being a manager as a manager is above a worker. This can easily be seen in terms of drivers and passengers in a car. The whole team is set on a direction, with a similar vision, but it is the leader’s responsibility to get them there. The passengers have the freedom to talk, listen to loud music, goof off, sleep, surf the web on their phones, but the driver has to get everyone to the destination safely, and preferably on time. The decisions the leader makes are different ones, and there is certainly more responsibility, but also the freedoms of the driver are reduced as well.

I will be reading this off and on to help with my leadership qualities. The author also recommends taking some time out to read other books on management and leadership. If you set aside a half-chapter a night devoted to leadership, you’re likely to get in a book a month- 12 a year. In 15 years, that’s about 150 books. Can I become a better leader simply by reading books and taking actions?

I think I’m willing to find out. – Tyler Dockery

 

ECGC: Leadership – Leading Disciplines You Don’t Understand

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Leading disciplines you don't understand

Session entitled: Managing Disciplines You Don’t Understand, ECGC, 4/24/14. Professional development on leadership with Dustin Clingman. This session was principally for producers and anyone managing a multi-disciplined task force.

Leaders and leads are primarily the target for this talk. Clingman posed the question: “What shall we rant about?” asking leads and leaders what some of the major complaints about their jobs happen to be.

Major responses included:

  • Team members (or team as a whole) don’t do what they say  they will
  • They don’t follow through
  • They provide work that does not meet specs
  • They fail to communicate (problems, solutions, issues, or at all)
  • Excuses (there’s always an excuse)
  • They do not meet established schedules

Many team members do not understand that leaders and leads are on the spear’s tip to meet deadlines and produce quality work.

What is the role that we play as the lead? We have the ability to explain and understand the scope and intent of the project, goals, parameters, and the timeline. We have to make sure team is happy or healthy (preferably both).

In reverse, what are the staff saying about the leaders?

  • Producers suck.
  • Producers suck. (this is not a typo, these are the top 2 complaints)
  • Producers talk, and they don’t listen
  • Producers don’t defend us
  • We’re always being crunched
  • What do they do?
  • I’ve never worked with a good producer.

Where does that energy come from? Those commenters are not bad apples or poor designers or crybabies. Those responses are from qualified employees. Producers are middle managers- buffers and barriers between workers and the management team. Many producers take so much time managing and not enough time leading. So, I have renamed this discussion and professional development session:

 

LEADING DISCIPLINES YOU DONT UNDERSTAND

“Producer” is a term pulled from the movie-making and video industry. Perhaps because we see video games as elaborate and award-winning as movies. Real producers gather the money to make a film come to the screen, and then take an elaborate amount of the attention. So, we are not paying for the production costs, but maybe taking credit though.

Not all producers have experience with each and every discipline in the game industry. Just ask a developer. It can be said that the level of happiness for Developers is measures by the number of WTFs per minute. The important thing to remember here though, is that we are all different, and we are all the same. Many of us chosen to be leaders have little or no experience- and some of us no interest- in leading. If successful, we charge ahead from game to game, we don’t backfill or teach people how to be great leaders. There is little in the budget or time for leadership training, and most of us achieve training within the the community.

 

TESTING: BOON OR BUST?

Myers-Briggs and True Colors tests are good to point out blind spots in our views, and different needs for staff members based on emotional behavior. BLAME-CULTURES are the worst. Don’t take the test if you work in a blame culture location. People will lump together into hate groups and strike out or shun those who think differently. Bad information in these climates can be used to reinforce grouping behavior, and it will be painful in the end.

Most leaders are FORCED into the role. Some choose it. It is lonely being OF the people but at the spear’s tip, leading the group. As a leader, you need to recognize the personality and humanity of those under you. They will not think the same of you.   😦

The boss needs to know the people. Spend time investing in personal relationships, get to know them (that is their lives) outside of work, etc. Don’t be a buddy over a boss, but fraternize in limited amounts. This will pay big dividends. Once you can recognize their qualities and individuality, they are willing to work harder.

 

Give clear directions, and Grow a Spine

Decide a production methodology that works and then find a way to sell it to your management and team. “But, we’ve always done it this way” are the seven most dangerous words in business.

Grow a spine when either side fights back. If you’ve agreed on a path, take it- don’t let management above roll your team, and don’t let the team force you away from your path. Hold people accountable and support them. Spinelessness is not leadership. Negotiation and compromise ARE leadership. It is evil to be disengenuous to your team and crumble to the boss. Be swift, spare no souls who stand in the way. People are often afraid to tell the truth, especially if it is about failure, disagreement on keen points, or needing more than you initially planned. IF you tell the truth, you can return to the team as a hero

 

Protect the creative environment

Find out how your people like to work best, and enable that to happen. Get buy-in from the rest of the studio or at least your neighbors. Examples of this might include: quiet time from 2-5pm, low/high light, headphones

Keep YOUR personal life together

You can’t lead when you’re not in your right mind. All your hard work on relationships in your workplace can be ruined by a glib comment or two. Know how to keep things separated. If you’re the leader, you never get a pity party. EVER. There is a lot of stress in leadership, but you cannot let that affect your workplace

Get rid of troublemakers
If you have non-performing indvidual, do not balk about getting them on a performance plan. Mental anguish arises and team morale quickly declines when one person isn’t pulling their weight. Developers don’t like conflict, because that’s your job as a manager. Everyone would rather do more work than have to put up with someone dragging them down.

Don’t over-manage/be a control freak too often
If you come from another discipline, use it. Don’t ever argue over colors or words.

Learn how to play poker
For leaders, this is a must. Life itself is a game of incomplete information. How people behave or patterns they exhibit become their behaviors. How they play poker is how they think about life

Play to the strengths of the team
set them up for success at least on this project. FInd the path that works and speed things up. Some team members thrive under controlled crunch. Find out ow your team works best and then create those conditions.

DON’T BULLSHIT ANYONE OVER ANYTHING. EVER.
This will trivialize them. If you don’t know, ask them questions and make them teach you,

 

So leadership tactics formed easily in the first part of this discussion, but lets talk specifically about how to manage and lead disciplines if you are unfamiliar with the archetypes.

Managing the artists
Artists need space and they space out more than you like. Save them from themselves, get involved early and give good boundaries to your art requests. Be very specific about what you want to see, how many variations, how many ideas, etc. Rework drives them BONKERS, especially when this is preventable.

Managing engineers
When engineers explain their ideas and plans passionately, ask them to deconstruct this for the lay person. Don’t be afraid to ask them what the options are. Look to them as technical mentors and ask how you can learn more about a particular subject. Beware the coding zinger joke.

Managing designers
Designers want rules, but they are often tempted to break them. Give them Bite size work, and embrace the protypes! Support them, organizational chart pending. Understand that they exist to give order to the game. They are frequently Tauran, liking stability, sameness, comfort.

Managing sound designers
Audio guys want respect. Bring them into the process early so they can be part of the ideas and concept from the very beginning. People usually want to build the game THEN add the sound, like a movie. The more immersed the sound designers are, the better the product will be. Be very, very clear with your feedback.

 

Closing Thoughts

How can you get people to separate their ego from the end product? Well, you can’t. Leadership starts at the top. I never introduced a person as someone who works FOR me, but rather I introduced them as someone who works WITH me. If ego is trumped at the top, it will trickle down. Leadership should be humble, willing to do everything they ask others to do. Preferably the interview process will allow you to throw someone under the bus and tout themselves so you can get an idea of what they’ll be like in your organization, but good luck getting that to happen…

ECGC: What Makes You Think YOU Know What A Leader Is?

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So you think YOU know what makes a great leader?!?

Went to the East Coast Gaming Conference Session: What makes you think YOU know what a leader is? as presented by Keith Fuller

In this lecture, Keith Fuller talked about leadership and what some of the qualities of good leaders were, and what was the major roadblock in the industry as far as leadership goes. He began by letting us know what his expectations of us for the talk were: that we would care , that we would participate, and that we would focus.

Leaders set the expectations for those they lead. And a leader, by definition, is responsible for the behavior, tasks, work performance, and development of one or more people whom they manage. The Jetsons boss is NOT leadership.

Leaders watch the quality of your work, and put you where you’ll be best used. A good leader makes you want to show up! The best leaders are approachable, and knows you as a person!

Leaders should not be pulled from a hat. “working ok” is not the same as innovating and excelling. Work should be lead to be efficient, not a “churn and burn” prfoile, because time you are spending at work is not time with the ones you love.

Quality of leadership can be most accurately seen through employee engagement. When and employee cares and is engaged, they work harder. When they are disengaged, they cost you money and productivity.

Quality of work as measured by the happiness of the employee can be directly noted through 2 main objectives: Their relationship with their immediate supervisor, and their belief in senior leadership. More often than not, you don’t quit a company, you quit a boss.

Consider reading:  “First, break all the rules” by Buckingham and Coffman.

If stuck down into  two main points from these hundreds of interviews:

  1. First, treat each employee as a person- know things about them and care about them
  2. Secondly, Don’t make leadership the default career path- great skills do not always translate into leadership, not everyone wants to become a leader.

Communicate, Relate, and Motivate.

Consider reading: “12 – The elements of great managing” wagner and karter

Good leaders have consistently good social skills, are impactful, value people, and objectively improves the business- doing so by supporting the people (arguably the most important part [supporting the people] of the group)

Biggest obstacle to quality leadership: the idea and pat response “We’re good.” (you are fooling yourself). Poor leaders and organizations that sponsor poor leadership feel they have no need to focus on leadership or improving performance.

 

Here was a good exercise:

You will get points for your organization (0-5) based on the following questions, Yes or No, 1pt a piece:
—————————————–

  1. You’re asked to give feedback about lead?
  2. Does everyone get regular 1:1 meetings?
  3. Performance review more than 1/year?
  4. Specific training in leadership skills?
  5. Does lead ask “how can I help you?”

 

Are you willing to give your score and NAME your company out loud? Some were willing to give their score out loud (About half). However, when they were asked if they were will to give their company name, it dropped to 4 individuals.
Problem: you are not willing to discuss this and name this in public.

 

What makes you think you know what a leader is? People are more open and will talk about taking notes in meetings, but NOT about what makes a leader.

WHY? Well, this could be a reputation issue that stops you from getting hired in the future. Many people are worried that the proud nail gets knocked down. What if you are the leader? Are you prepared to self-identify as a bad leader or to ask for help? We should encourage people to ask questions! Getting up to complain on a Soap Box is a bad idea, a 1:1 meeting is the right way.

ECGC: Gamified Talent Management: Using RPG design to motivate employees and redefine work

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Gamification and Leadership

Today at ECGC (The East Coast Gaming Conference), I attending a leadership training seminar: Gamified Talent Management: Using RPG design to motivate employees and redefine work, a lecture by IBM guru Phaedra Boinodiris. This was really fantastic, and should fit nicely with the classroom gamification that I’d like to see in some of our flagging classes. Phaedra Boinodiris identified 4 major attributes of using gamification to find and motivate successful employees:

  1. Cognitive stability
  2. Cognitive complexity
  3. motor-impusivity
  4. establishes a baseline

She then demonstrated a game used for potential employees, a game in which the user built a structure with spots and lines to reach a given point. This could then be used with responsive software to determine some of the cognitive qualities of the individual to help with the onboarding process. She further showed some proprietary software (darnit!) which could be used to chart an individual’s current state and progress in a gamification environment: Nick’s portal environment result from data showing changes and adjustment over time.

Using their previous data as well as the results of the employee profile and reviews, a composite was created similarly to a character sheet– showing calculated mentor matches (along with that mentor employee’s contact information, job matches and suggested promotion track to achieve it, how that employee ranked against others in the industry, how that employee was perceived by their peers, how the current marketplace is embracing their recognized skillsets, an employee assessment, and list of training or certifications suggested for the employee.

Upon my request, Ms. Boinodiris would not reveal information about IBM’s proprietary software. 😦

Questions posed by the leaders using this software required the team to be evaluated as a group. Once all members had taken the assessment, a team could further be assessed, posing questions based upon the team performance in addition to the qualities shown by the team:

  • “To be good at my job, what paths need to be completed?”
  • “What training needs to be completed by our current team?”
  • “What training might need to be required of new or potential team members?”
  • “How many goals are being completed within the group?”
  • “What is it about the ‘class’ of employee that makes this optimal or in need to accomplish our team or individual goals?”

Based on results of these tests and questions, what kind of employees are they? Could you give them designations such as hunter, farmer, leader, etc.? After a class designation has been properly identified, can you change or adjust these designations to make your team the team you desire or the team numbers show is best suited for a particular task?

Once backed up with data, adjustments to your staff’s ‘class’ could be made by sending them ‘quests’ perhaps once per day or week. These quest tasks would slowly evolve the thinking of the team or team members, so that training is no longer siloed. For instance, you might recognize ‘Hunter’ employees as those who track down new, effective leads. ‘Farmers’ on the other hand, might be constantly revisiting old leads to grow new business in already fertile ground. You might assign hunters to revisit ‘old hunting grounds’ once a day and slowly evolve their systems. Farmers on the other hand, might strike out into leads on ‘newly forested areas’ where they can begin relationships and begin a new harvesting in new areas.

By removing the siloed training, you make continual training something that is both approachable and achievable. Also, it CAN become fun. However, you must find ways to provide tailored content to make sure your employees know what they need to do, or show them how they can improve.

It is vitally important to remember: As far as gamification goes, if you’re spending a majority of your time at the beginning determining what motivates your audience, you are doing it wrong.

When adding gamification to your school, workplace, etc, you must avoid the ‘chocolate covered brocoli’ – adding a small benefit to something which your population already hates. A badge alone will NOT motivate the students or employees anymore than covering something they don’t want with chocolate.

The Multiplayer Classroom by Sheldon Lee
The Multiplayer Classroom by Sheldon Lee

Consider reading The Multiplayer Classroom by Sheldon Lee. (I spoke with Sheldon Lee the author during a conference call last week. This was great timing!)

seriousgames_book
Serious Games for Business by Phaedra Boinodiris

Also consider reading Serious Games for Business by Phaedra Boinodiris

 

I felt this was a great presentation, and I learned a lot that I felt would be helpful in methods of leadership! Tell me what you think!

LEA 124 – Leadership Training: Beyond Diversity

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Tyler Dockery celebrates Diversity with strong leadership
Tyler Dockery celebrates Diversity

LEA 124 – Leadership Training: Beyond Diversity

Since I had taken LEA113 (Understanding Diversity in the Workplace) and I clearly “understand” Diversity in the Workplace, it’s time to look BEYOND Diversity and put this clear level of understanding into action.

This course was presented by Jackie Popp (Jacqueline Popp) and Kimberly Breivogel on Wake Tech Community College’s Main Campus. During this leadership training session, we tooke a look at the biases we all hold (and we all have them, even if we’re not aware of it!).

We then explored how we could respectfully interact with others while actively working to reduce or eliminate preconceived notions which prevent us from being as effective as we could be, especially in the workplace. Research-based, hands-on activities and case studies allowed us to apply learning content to the workplace. We shared experiences as we got to know each other

In this class it was very interesting to see Cindy Foster, department head of Wake Tech’s Simulation and Video Game Development curriculum. Her experiences from the state and areas where she grew up made for some excellent insights. In her case study, her group had a staff member making harassing comments repeatedly. Her team made the breakthrough realization that the staff member might not be under their management control, which opened up a loooong and frankly quite fruitful discussion on how to deal with people under your management, those outside of your management, the difference in legal matters, performance improvement plans, and written/verbal warnings.

I thought this would be a general rehash of an earlier class, and was very pleased to find it stepping above and beyond my expectations.

LEA 113: Leadership Training – Understanding Diversity In The Workplace

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Tyler Dockery celebrates Diversity with strong leadership
Tyler Dockery celebrates Diversity

LEA 113: Leadership Training – Understanding Diversity In The Workplace

In this third installment of the Leadership Training at Wake Tech Community College, our presenters – Noah Spencer and Shemika Bell – dropped some of the essentials to understanding diversity in the workplace on us.

“What is Diversity?” Truth be told, the answers may have been as various as the people, ethnicities, and even personalities in the room. Many people are afraid to state their definition for fear that they may do or say something wrong. This session aimed to make things clearer by opening a fear-free forum. Competencies addressed in this session included understanding diversity, gauging awareness of diversity, and promoting equality and diversity.

We opened with some exercises using our Jung Typologies ( I am an INTJ “mastermind” ) and a brief rewind of our emotional intelligence training. It was nice to see that this was still important information to consider.

Barriers to Understanding Diversity

  • Denial of Issues
  • Lack of Awareness/Trust
  • Fear of Offending/Being seen as…
  • Intercultural Differences
    • Communication Styles
    • Concepts of Time
    • Concepts of Power

 

“We all have a seat at the table”
Annie Holmes

Recognizing, Understanding, and Valuing Differences

Inclusivity: Looking at our practices and procedures to ensure all have equal access and opportunities

Inclusive Excellence: A framework that incorporates achieving excellence through diversity and inclusive efforts

 

The Four Layers of Diversity aka The Diversity Wheel

  • Functional Level/ Classification
  • Geographic Location
  • Age
  • Personality
  • Physical
  • Ability
  • Educational
  • Background
  • Work Location
  • Seniority
  • Union
  • Affiliation
  • Division
  • Depart./
  • Unit/
  • Group
  • Work
  • Content/
  • Field
  • Management
  • Status
  • Marital
  • Status
  • Parental
  • Status
  • Appearance
  • Income
  • Personal
  • Habits
  • Recreational
  • Habits
  • Religion
  • Work
  • Experience
  • Race
  • Ethnicity
  • Sexual
  • Orientation
  • Gender

Honstly, there were so many of these that I simply could not keep up. I can type 45 words per minute, and it simply wasn’t long enough for the slides

  • Internal Dimensions
  • External Dimensions
  • Organizational Dimensions
  • Intercultural Differences
  • Communication Styles
  • Concepts of Time
  • Concepts of Power

 

What Does Diversity Mean?

AFFIRMING PEOPLE: Treating everyone respectfully, regardless of how you feel about their culture or lifestyle.

CONFRONTING BEHAVIOR

  • Jokes negative remarks
  • Not seeing omissions
  • Challenging stereotypes and fears.

SHIFTING CULTURAL NORMS / VALUES

  • Identifying barriers to:
    • women
    • people of color
    • people with disabilities
    • others who experience discrimination.
  • Creating an environment that removes barriers and extends cooperation.

 

Diversity Tips

  • Understand that diversity exists.
  • Acknowledge your own stereotypes and assumptions.
  • Develop consciousness and acceptance of your own cultural background and style.
  • Respect both the similarities and differences about people.