north carolina

RISE Training!

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On 3/15/19 at 12:00pm, I attended the Professional Development Session RISE Training at the Engineering and Technology Building (SE 226) at Wake Technical Community College’s South Campus in Raleigh, NC presented by Scarlet Edwards.

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RISE Training

We learned about the new RISE initiative across the state of North Carolina. Scarlet Edwards will be teaching us. RISE is critical for fall advising. This is a mandatory meeting for Matt Henry’s team, and they were nice enough to allow me to join this professional development training.

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Completion Percentages: A Clear Look

One of the important things that we looked at was a clear graph outlining the completion percentages for students attempting college level Math and English in the first two years of college. The two courses were not significantly different, so we’re looking at the math numbers here. While numbers are increasing as time moves forward and we are offering more online classes in these, numbers of actual completions are still low. However, statistics show that students who complete these gateway courses achieve degrees.

It should be noted that 2014-2015 is when the multiple measure model was begun.

The college would like to see more students completing English and Math “Gateway” courses in the first two years. Many students are holding off on these courses, and then failing them so many times that they fail to achieve a college degree, or are forced to complete their AAS degree at another institution- we do all the work toward great training, and another school achieves our completion. We’d like to stop that.

By “Encouraging” our students to take these courses before other standard curriculum courses for our degrees, we will ultimately see more completions and student successes.

Instead of offering testing for students, a new system will place new students into classes automatically, and we should encourage our students to take these classes first.

 

A Healthy Debate

At this point in the discussion, there was a very healthy debate which erupted. Many faculty members voiced their opinions before everyone was encouraged to save questions to the end. This training is mandatory, and it is very important that every person has a chance to hear the information. I held my questions for the end, but the following points were made very clear:

  • One faculty member has been teaching for 30 years. They noted that ENG and MAT courses are important, but the job skills are more important. Pushing off things that you like (technology training) for things which you don’t like (math problems and english papers) will encourage more students to quit early rather than late.
  • Another faculty member noted that we would have more completers in the programs if we could have pre-degree requirements like the nursing program has. They have a 100% completion and 100% job-placement rating because they are able to cherry pick the best students before they begin. If we had this ability, we’d have no problems
  • A faculty member suggested that if we could expand our program to a 3 year degree program we could solve many of these problems.
  • Another faculty member stated that since neither Math nor English were Pre-requirements or Co-requirements for any classes within their program, there was no impetus to push this agenda. As student could get perfectly far in the program without facing any barriers to success.
  • Another faculty member noted that students who fail in a majority of the intro classes do so because the ESL (english as a second language) and EFL (english as a foreign language) students have passed ENG111, but still cannot read or communicate well. Those students have already met these requirements and already are on a road to failure. This program should start with ESL and EFL and then evaluate success before putting this to all faculty
  • One faculty member with over 20 years teaching noted that this system has not worked in the past and would not work. This was heavily agreed upon across the room, but since we hadn’t really heard the proposal yet, I thought this point was moot.
  • One faculty member was quite vocal that programming required a mathematical mindset, but did not require intense calculations. Taking the math class before buckling down toward making some headway in their degree would not help the student, but might detract them from any of the material.
  • One faculty member who had to take the gateway college algebra math class recently noted that the course was set up in such a way that unless you had taken the course before, your chances of completing it satisfactorily was nearly impossible. Unless, they noted you had already known the material of the course. It was set up so that those who knew the material would pass first time through, but those without intimate knowledge of it could be “thrown to the wolves”.
  • Eventually, order was restored with the interest of finishing in time. I took notes on my questions.

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NC Math Completions

These numbers on this slide were disturbing. One faculty member let us know that they told us the class was an issue, many people smiled politely. Based on population numbers, only 7% of African-Americans, 10% of Hispanics, Latinos, and Asians, and 14% of Caucasians pass a gateway level math course within 2 years of enrollment.

Lets take a look at the numbers for these specifically

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Gateway English Completions

Looking at other states, we see that there are similar numbers based on gateway courses. We see there are 2 specific options noted here: Gateway courses which require a pre-requisite class or classes, and Gateway courses which require a co-requisite class. In North Carolina, we require pre-requisite classes to determine whether students are ready or prepared for English and Math. We double-check this with compass testing.

Looking to other states, we see that several of them are using a similar system. Some have better numbers, others are below ours. These states, however, have seen a large increase and jump in completions based on the change from pre-req courses to co-req courses.

By adding in a secondary class— a co-requisite class— the states have found that they were able to dramatically increase the number of course completions. Some say that because students are able to continue working on ideas and concepts outside of class time.

 

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Gateway Math Completions

Again, we see the schools have very similar numbers to ours above. Again, when introducing the co-requisite courses, completions dramatically increase. These co-requisite classes are a bit like labs for science courses, or labs similar to language courses.

 

Question: Are these results accurate, or are they patting themselves on the back?

Answer: Good question. Our team visited schools in these states. They asked these same questions, and yes, these are the results they are seeing by the numbers.

 

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What Is Rise

RISE is the program in North Carolina which we will use to achieve a similar system. Durham Technical Community College is already using this system in North Carolina. We will be taking this system up in Fall 2019. We will use this information to help us advise our students and to get to know the system completely.

It is important to note that this system will be put in place to get our students into the English and Math Gateway classes sooner. Students who complete these classes in the first two years seem numerically to have greater success and completions.

Question: What if we find that students placed in these courses are not achieving these results?

Answer: Our intent with the RISE system is not to increase the passing rate. We are just using this system to allow students to get access sooner and receive concurrent support at the right time for the students.

 

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How Will Students Be Placed?

Compass testing was an easy requirement, but not every student tested well. And, the compass test will be going away. Moving forward, we will be using a new system based primarily on high school GPA. Based on a high school GPA, students will be placed in a column which will determine where students will start: Specifically, will a student be able to enter the gateway course directly, will they be required to take BOTH the gateway course and a co-requisite course, or will they need to take a transitional course?

GPA is the main determinate, but we can also see that testing scores on the ACT will also be taken into account. If students have scored well on the ACT score (within 2 points of the Target Score) of the particular category. Poor grades can be augmented by good test scores.

High School GPA is good for 10 years. If the result is over 10 years old, or not available, the student can pay to take the test for placement.

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RISE Placement Credits

In the new system, all of our pre-curriculum classes and requirements go away. Based on the high school GPA, students will receive some or all credits for transition courses.

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STAC Screen Need

Currently, we’ll need to use the STAC screen to see the credits given, as well as GPA and ACT scores. It was important to remember that the RISE system will not be in effect until the fall. Eventually, we will have a new screen called “XRISE” which will give use the right information.

 

Question: Is the ACT really this prevalent?

Answer: Yes, most schools use it now or encourage it. If a student does not have it, we may have SAT options available later, but just place them appropriately.

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RISE Placement

DAP Accuplacer is going away December 31st, if not before. Retaking the placement test is not allowed if you have high school GPA within 10yrs. Taking the test will cost the student money, and may take 5 hours. There are 3 sections of math (mastery tier 1,2,3) and 2 sections of english (mastery tier 1,2).

 

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Placement Test Q&A

In looking at the placement test Q&A, we ran into some questions about the placement testing. I’ll add them here:

 

Question: What if the student hasn’t received their official high school transcripts?

Answer: We can use an unofficial transcript to determine these courses.

Question: What if we have an army vet who joins and they don’t have a record?
Question: What if we have a student who school burned down/no longer exists/home schooled without GPA?

Answer: It happens. They’ll have to take the placement test and pay the fee. Some vets have been in the service so long that they have no GPA and have not undertaken any education, they take the test. Some old schools had paper records, and suffered a calamity or are no longer around, especially private institutions. Those students would take the test. Some home school students simply were not given grades. They also take the test.

 

 

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Co-Requisite Class Debate

At this time, there was another very lively debate. Many people had some loud and angry opinions. When the information was presented, it was given to us a very straightforward manner. This matter-of-fact information was clearly noted in an effort as if the presenter was trying to gloss over information. Eventually, the facilitator and the group head got people calmed down enough to continue. Concerns included:

  • One teacher with 20 years of experience who noted that this system would still never work
  • One teacher with 30 years of experience loudly noted that this would be impossible to keep track of
  • One teacher noted that some students would possibly be facing 9 hours just for math with a co-req, and 15 hours for math and english courses and their co-requisites. How will a student be able to start their education if they are taking 15 credit hours in the first semester?

After calming down, we settled on a few related questions.

 

Q&A Session

Question: Will the co-req grade count towards the GPA?

Answer: Yes, since it has credit hours, it will count towards student GPA

Question: How will the co-req count toward our degree credit numbers?

Answer: It will not be marked as a requirement. Students who are required to take it will have to do so.

Question: What if a student fails the co-req but passes the gateway class? What if they pass the co-req but fail the gateway class? What if they’re withdrawn from the pre-req class?

Answer: We’ll be talking about this later, but if a student fails the co-req class, they will be automatically dropped from the gateway course. However, if it comes down to the end of the course and the student passes the gateway course, they will still retain credit. If it comes down to the wire and the co-req is passed, the student will be able to take the gateway course a second time.

Question: What if the student chooses not to sign up for the co-req?

Answer: The co-req and the class will have to be signed up for together. They will be taught by different instructors. To sign up for one, the student must sign up for the other.

Question: What if the student stops going to the co-req class?

Answer: If a student is withdrawn from the co-req class for any reason, they will be automatically withdrawn from the gateway class.

Question: What if a student signs up for a co-req gateway because it fits their schedule. They are not required to take the co-req class.

Answer: Yes, that is true, but if they drop or withdraw from the co-req, they will be withdrawn from the gateway course. Students can opt-in to take the co-req but they’re under the same course requirements as other students. In for a penny, in for a pound.

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Gateway Transition Courses

Developmental classes will go away at the end of the summer. Since there is really only a single ENG111 transitional course now, any students in remedial programs should endeavour to take RED097 to get themselves to the ENG111 course. There are several transition courses for math, because there are several gateway math courses. In some cases, this can be very helpful, because any math class can be used for our degrees.

Pedagogically speaking, a better option in some cases might be for students to sign up for the gateway w/co-req on purpose.

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RISE Placement

Just a recap: the DAP Accuplacer is going away December 31st, if not before. Retaking the placement test is not allowed if you have high school GPA within 10yrs. Taking the test will cost the student money, and may take 5 hours. There are 3 sections of math (mastery tier 1,2,3) and 2 sections of english (mastery tier 1,2).

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Advising Consideration

Students taking these classes will not have the same teacher for the gateway course and the co-req course. The gateway course teacher can take the grade of the co-req into account when deciding on a final grade for the course.

Healthy Debate #3

At the question about this, faculty had some very strong opinions

  • One faculty member asked to know what the criteria which could be taken into account might be?
    Answer: It is up to the teacher. They can take anything into account. Assignments, attendance, final grade, class participation, its all up to the teacher
  • One faculty member said that this sounded totally subjective, and some faculty members can take it into account and others would not?
    Answer: Well, it is up to the teacher to decide
  • If students ask the teacher and the teacher says “They will not take any other classes into account” can they change their minds?”
    Answer: Yes, it will be up to the teacher to decide
  • If the student no longer wishes to be in the class or co-req because the teacher is colluding with the gateway teacher, or vice versa, how will that effect them?
    Answer: leaving either class will put them in a new course and new co-req— the classes are linked. This wouldn’t be  good idea though, the new teacher may decide to take the grades into account and you’re right back where you started
  • So, if a student is getting an A in the gateway course, fully participates, and is leading the class, they could still fail or get a b,c,d,f in the class… totally at the teacher’s discretion
    Answer: Yes, the teacher can take the other class into account. If the student is not participating in the co-req classes, the gateway teacher could adjust the grade at their discretion.
  • Don’t you think this might cause a lawsuit? An A-level student can be failed or dropped massively because while they are attending all classes, the co-req teacher might feel a “D” is earned in one class and should be pushed into the other?
    Answer: Its possible, but they probably wouldn’t. But they could.

This seemed like it was going to be a problem. There is no official policy, its just teacher-decided material. Looks like it could be misused, abused, taken incorrectly, etc. The school is going to be on the wrong side of this.

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Optional Examples

Take a look at each of these examples and see where they should be placed!

 

Example 1: Kim

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Because Kim has a 2.8 GPA or higher, she can go directly into a Gateway course.

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Example 2: John

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John will need to take transitional math courses, unless he can complete up to MAT050 this summer. I’d advise John to track down his 2011 high school transcript (clearly not present), and to take ENG097 this summer if his GPA was 2.2 or less. This would get him into the ENG co-req in a single session.

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Example 3: Brandy

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Brandy can go directly into the MAT121 Gateway because while her GPA is less than 2.8, she has an ACT math score which is high enough. She can take the gateway course over the summer, or better still, just take a break. She’ll have to co-req ENG111.

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Example 4: Wheaton

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Wheaton is good to go with no co-req due to high GPA and ACT scores, if the ACT was in 2008. Otherwise he’ll have to take the 5-hour placement test. Wheaton looks super-duper young to be in his 30s. I think this was a plant.

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Example 5: Amy

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Amy has too low of a GPA to go into any gateway courses alone, but she has a high enough ACT in Math to get a co-req course. She’s applying for the spring, so if she can take MAT020 this summer, she can get into MAT110 in the fall. Similarly, if she can take DRE097 this summer, she can get a co-req english course.

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Example 6: Pete

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Pete can take MAT121 in the fall with a co-req. He’s got credit for the high level maths, so if pete can finish MAT010-050 this summer, he can skip the co-req. Instead, he should take DRE097 this summer and get into the co-req for english.

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Example 7: Chasity

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Chasity is looking at a co-req with math, but I don’t know the SAT scores… If she can complete DRE097, she can take the co-req with english in the spring.

 

EXAMPLE 8: Julian

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Julian can take DMA040-050 and not worry about co-reqs, and eng with a co-req in the fall.

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Example 9: Sarah

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Sarah should take DMA050 this summer and DRE098 if she can. This will save her extra hours and cost

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I felt this was good training, but I already had a leg up on most people. I worry that summer school numbers of courses offered will go down. There will be courses offered, but there will need to be a far larger number of ENG faculty on campus, and that means more rooms.

Since our departments do not really require these ENG classes or MAT courses as pre-reqs for our programs, there is not an intrinsic need for us to push these classes sooner. It actually seems to work contrary to our purposes to push these classes at the beginning, and instead better to shove them off onto the summer courses. I worry about the “taking in to account” vagaries in the language, and see a pretty hefty lawsuit. If one student sues, another just has to “think” that the work is biased in some fashion to have a legitimate case. Once a student wins, every student who was under the policy could have legal grounds for changes to transcripts, and compensation if their grades were not good enough to transfer to their college of choice.

Dangerous.

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Taking Your Seated Classes Online: An easier transition than you think

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On 3/6/19 at 9:00am, and then again at 10:30am on 3/8/19 I presented at the North Carolina Computer Instructor Association Conference Session Taking Your Seated Classes Online at East Carolina University’s SCITech Building in Greenville, NC. This was co-presented by Tyler Dockery and Carla Osborne of Wake Technical Community College.

Taking Your Seated Classes Online:

An easier transition than you think

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Q&A

How can you handle Attendance in the online environment?

Since students in an online environment might login and logout without contributing and demand that they are counted as attending, we suggest working differently. Base your attendance on turning in all work for the week. Since students have 7 days to complete assignments and materials, failing to present all or part of the course materials is a conscious choice on the part of the student.

If a student turns in all assignments and participated in discussions (regardless of grade), mark them as attending. Failing to complete one or more item in the week deserves a tardy.

What if you do not have ZOOM

Zoom is a free technology, and it allows you to record up to 40 minutes in the free version. Some people use Microsoft Teams, which also has video content. I have access to MS Teams, but honestly I don’t have as much experience with teams to know how it works.

What if you have good content, but its not Closed Captioned?

Some people find they can reach out directly to the video owner and ask for them. On youtube, you can ask the owner to open Community Contributions, and allow you to add in the captions that you’d like, but you can also use https://amara.org to create a closed caption overlay of the original video without breaking copyright. You will have to caption it yourself, but its a small price to pay for good content.

How do you determine the first dates in your classes?

At Wake Technical Community College, we have a course entry quiz which must be taken. The quiz is set for adaptive release, and once the quiz is taken, the plagiarism agreement is shown. Once the plagiarism agreement is submitted, then students can enter the class. This is not used everywhere though.

Some school use the first  assignment submitted as the entry date, but this causes a great deal of work on the part of the teacher, hunting down student by student in several areas just to get an answer. One instructor noted that she got tired of hunting and created her own entry material. Several other teachers followed her path once she displayed how easily it could be used.

 

 

Teaching Professionalism

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On 3/7/19 at 1:45pm, I attended the North Carolina Computer Instructors Association Conference Session Teaching Professionalism at the SCITECH Building at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC presented by Joy Dark.

Teaching Professionalism

 

Is there a need? By that, I mean does professionalism really have to be taught in the classroom?

Mark butler, commissioner for the Georgia department of labor stated “in the workforce shortage we’re facing right now. Soft skills are very much on of the biggest concerns”

Let’s take a look at these numbers from the impressions of employers in 2018 and the same impressions from the graduating class of 2017. See how the expectations and the realities don’t match up?

85% were deeply concerned about work ethic and soft skills: Attention, punctuality, character specifically

87% creative thinking and problem solving.

Job outlook 2018 employing organizations and the class of 2017 student survey report from national association of college and employers. Look at the disparity.

This is not new, this is a 19th century problem. Employers still looking for that work ethic, and they’ll be employing them longer.

What employers expect

Work Ethics

Attendance, character, teamwork, appearance, attitude, productivity, organizational skills, communication, cooperation, respect are graded. Those who enter with it, leave with it. Those who enter without it, don’t get it

DRIVE by Daniel H pink.

Four greatest motivators.

Exterinsic reward/punishment. Intrinsic: autonomy, contribution and masters. Extrinsic motivation takes you to about the $60,000/yr mark. Intrinsically motivated engineer usually becomes an entrepreneur. Many of us are on the left, extrinsically motivated. We want to get to the right side.

Open discussion: How do we create a professional culture in the classroom?

Set your expectations. These are the expectations, these are the goals. You’re expected to get the job done and get the job done well. Classes are no longer classes, but a meeting with the employees.

Set the individual and team goals. What are the team strengths and weaknesses? Give them room to have space and make mistakes. Have the goal, give the resources, and give them the room to get there. Boss expects you to find the goals and reach the point of success.

How will you be accessed?

Lead by example.

Do as I do, not just as I say. Show on time, dressed appropriately. Lead. Respect, curiosity, appropriate behavior. Show examples or leave it open for interpretation.

Give respect even if you haven’t received it yet

Even if students are late, you are not. Even if students yell, you act respectively. Unconditional respect is important. You honor them and their efforts, even if they have not met the minimum. This does not mean that you accept the unacceptable, it means you treat them respectfully as you are working with them. This is especially good if you frame the change in terms of “I recommend that you…”

 

Call them out

Have that uncomfortable conversation. Be honest. Call them out on behaviors which are negative issues for the class. Make comments in general first, and then specific after the fact. Sometimes it is effective to note that specific issues need to be pulled out. Some confrontational conversations can occur without the confrontation. If you let one get away with problems , they all get away. Some say “This is just a classroom”. Seeing this is the kind of item whereit is not a reflection of the real world is a fallacy.

My job is to get you a job. Make good grades, learn the skills, and get that job. If you take the expectation from “I don’t care if you come to class in your PJs, just come to class”… to “You need to dress professionally if you want a job”.  Many people will note that the disparity between the rating differences above are related to the fact that students are not being called out for being unprofessional.

VLC professionality course coming in Fall 2019/2020. Basic skills, coned, curriculum. There are 8 competency items.

Students may not know how to behave in a given environment. This is now your job. Arrive here by XXxx.  Do not plan to leave before XXxx. Set aside XX hours of time for homework. Decide how to include time management issues on how to solve the problems.

Provide choices

Provide choices with natural consequences. Your job as the teacher is to enforce those consequences. These are the expectations. There are room rules. Make sure they are clear. Hold people accountable. Grades are a real world application. This is a guage of how the real world makes this available.

 

Encourage responsibility

Encourage responsiblility through contribution. One good example is the responsibility of teamwork. Have your team members call them out as well. Peer pressure is a good thing.

Don’t give up

Especially when they give up on themselves. Students can start to have more confidence in themselves and do better in class when they find out that someone is behind them. A pep talk and cheerleader moment can help them to get back on their feet and decide what their correct path might be. Compassion can be a hard truth and sometimes the truth hurts.

IF you screw up, say you’re sorry. Don’t worry about the person, worry about the problem. Don’t focus on the problem, focus on the solution.

 

High standards

High standards for everyone. Without it, everyone suffers. Without proper training, what are we doing? Really. High standards for us as well as them

Grade your listening skills.

Address it and look to general attitude in the classroom and a completely subjective grade. Responding to questions can be a matter of responsibility. If it doesn’t contribute to the overall discussion, those items don’t count

Challenge Reactions

Challenge reactions to challenging situations. Get the ball rolling and then see if they can work toward larger solutions. There are many ways to solve problems, and this will teach resilience, bringing them back and forcing them to face challenges.

Use Delayed Gratification

Use delayed gratification to build grit and gratitude.  Use projects which build upon one another.

Group participation

Speak, listen, organize, lead

Mock interview and orientation

Overwhelming first experiences. How do you expect them to dress? Is on-time early or late

Framework for lifelong learning

VISION

In the real world, there will be no boss dragging you through the project. You’re either going to get it, and its going to work properly or you’re not. You’ll get fired. You need to take, this, own this, and make the decisions.

You might have to spell this out for people. Traditionally, we celebrate individual accomplishments. When we celebrate what the class has done, this increases what motivates us to do well. Carrot and stick doesn’t really motivate, but when they take control and own it, we’re setting you up for success. IF yo use the test as something to endure, then you’re seeing it as a problem. If you see the test as a tool for knowing where  they stand and what they know, it so much more than a completion item.

 

 

BFA Design from UNC-G!

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At 6pm On December 18th, 1998 I attended the 1998 Winter Commencement Ceremonies presented by The University of North Carolina at Greensboro at the Greensboro Convention Center in Greensboro, NC.

Received my BFA in Design from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro!

Tyler Dockery attended UNC-G, receiving his BFA in Design in 1998
Tyler Dockery attended UNC-G, receiving his BFA in Design in 1998

Today I received my Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Design with a specialization in Graphic Design and Mutlimedia. Hooray!

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is the highest undergraduate degree that you can receive in the arts, with the Bachelor of Arts as a lesser degree requiring no foreign language or upper-tier courses. In short:

How Fine Arts Degrees Stack Up

Here is the breakdown of visual arts to liberal arts credits that you will encounter in a BFA or BA program:

  • Bachelor of Fine Arts: A BFA requires that approximately two thirds of the course work focus on the creation and study of visual arts, and one third of the course work focus on liberal arts (history, literature, psychology, etc.).
  • Bachelor of Arts: For a BA, the course work ratios are flipped, with a two thirds focus on liberal arts and one third focus on visual arts.

These ratios hold true across all establishments of higher learning. The type of degree, not the institution, determines the amount of visual arts to liberal arts you will study.

Tyler Dockery Attended UNC-G (new logo shown) receiving a BFA in Design in 1998
Tyler Dockery Attended UNC-G (new logo shown) receiving a BFA in Design in 1998

I chose to take the BFA degree track in design because I want to teach graphic design at the collegiate or university level. To do this, I would have to really get into the field and get to know all facets of design. The BFA program at UNC-G  ( http://www.uncg.edu will open in another window) has a focus on both the traditional design methodologies such as drawing, sculpture, color theory, painting, etc., coupled with an emphasis on software and multimedia design. This dual-emphasis on the old and the new will really give me a boost in the workplace (hoping).

 

Software I learned in school

  • Adobe Photoshop 3.0
  • Adobe Illustrator 2.0
  • Adobe Premiere
  • Adobe Pagemaker
  • Quark XPress
  • Hypercard
  • Supercard
  • Aldus Freehand 5.0
  • Macromedia Flash 2.0
  • Macromedia Director
  • Some HTML

Where did you go to school, and what did you learn? Let me know in the comments area!