sgd

GRD/WEB/SGD Faculty Meeting: Faculty Professional Development Conference 2015

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On April 2nd, 2015 at Wake Tech’s North Campus, Alison Consol and Cindy Foster addressed the GRD, WEB and SGD department faculty at the Wake Tech Faculty Professional Development Conference from 10:00am until noon

Faculty Professional Development Conference 2015

GRD/WEB/SGD Faculty Meeting: Faculty Professional Development Conference 2015

This meeting was very enjoyable, including a greater understanding of

Advising 102

This was a great method of determining the best ways to encourage students to sign up for certifications, diplomas, and our associate degrees. The emphasis here was on completions, math courses which could be accepted, and updates to evaluate course progressions, and the ease of helping students to complete their diploma programs by helping them to register for graduation.

In the second half of the department meeting, we focused on EPIC preparedness. This was equal parts course preparedness, menu building, and standards. This concluded with a longer, more team-oriented approach entitled “On The Border”.

The only strange part of this encounter was that a faculty member from chemistry signed up for our department meeting. That guy had no idea what we were talking about, and frankly didn’t really care about our policies. So, that was a waste of his time, and he chose to stay until the end. I’d do this again every semester.


Alison Consol is the head of both the Advertising and Graphic Design department, and Web Design Department at Wake Tech Community College.
Cindy Foster is the head of the Simulation and Video Game Development department at Wake Tech Community College

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Using XBOX Kinect for Motion Capture

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2013 Spring Staff and Faculty Conference Improvement by Design: Leading the Way
March 5, 2013, 8:00am to 8:45am

Location: BD 440 PC lab

Using XBOX Kinect for Motion Capture

This presentation, given by Wake Tech’s Simulation and Video Game Development department’s Brad Swearingen, and Brandon Crews, went into in-depth definition of how to create a low-cost motion capture station. This seminar used Microsoft’s XBOX Kinect to perform Motion Capture for animation. Through demonstration and hands-on activity we learned how to load software specific to Motion Capture, connect and set up the Kinect hardware, setup the best settings and techniques for capture motions, and captured footage to clean up animated files.

Capstone Courses Roundtable with Walter Rotenberry

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As part of Wake Tech Community College’s professional development seminar, I attended the Capstone Course Roundtable presented by Walter Rotenberry. Walter Rotenberry is the lead for Wake Tech’s SGD department (simulation and video game development).

In the roundtable discussion, Rotenberry laid out his procedure for a capstone course, which I have vaguely outlined below:

  1. Establish the course as a capstone for your program. Inform students prior to entering and upon their first day in the class the details involved with the planned courses of action. Include all expectations, all contingencies, the level of quality required, and how their potential employment may be affected by their level of commitment. Remind them that they will get out of the course whatever they put into it.
  2. Set a final date for presentation. Plan that date and make sure that the course centers around the expectations required on that date.
  3. Focus on what is achievable. Students in Rotenberry’s class presented all their materials to the class in their first week, each choosing their best project to work with, fleshing it out over time to a perfect, finished project to present.
  4. Involve the community. Rotenberry contacted his closest contemporaries at surrounding colleges (in his case, NCSU and their graduate program in Game Development) and had a few joint sessions in which his team and their team could exchange ideas, discuss current projects, and discuss current topics, trends, and ideas in the industry. This was instrumental in achieving a program in which questions would be posed, answered, and attended to BEFORE presentation
  5. Pitch your programs to the best in the business. OK, we presented to CEOs and presidents of video game companies in our area, Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill. Walter Rotenbery lined up the individuals and set their dates to attend, reminding them prior to the festivities, and following up with each one.
  6. Make an event of it. Students came prepared to discuss their work, networked with the individuals present and enjoyed snacks. After a short time had passed, each student presented their projects to the group, and in some cases individual computers were opened so that industry folk could try out each game on their own.
  7. Don’t let the music stop. Walter’s students passed out business cards and links to online portfolios and games. Students followed up with individuals, and several made appointments to meet with industry designers. Several employment opportunities came out of the presentations, and it has become a permanent addition to the SGD (simulation and game development) track.

In attending this training, I could clearly see how our Graphic Design IV or our Portfolio classes could easily become capstone courses. Portfolio could easily transition to involvement with local organizations such as AIGA here in Raleigh, NC or TIMA (triangle interactive Media Association). Graphic Design IV could easily ally with the Addy Awards or with GDUSA and other magazine contests. I look forward to discussing this with Damu Murray, Woody Hayes, and Marsha Mills.