success

Managing Your Iceberg

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At 9:30am on 4/23/2017, I attended Managing Your Iceberg, presented by Cory Miller, at the 2017 Wordcamp Conference in Raleigh, NC

Managing Your Iceberg

Cory opened by telling us that we’d be hearing some very personal things. Entrepeneurship is the hardest and most rewarding job there is. When looking at the important info, he came to this idea of the iceberg.

The tip we see is seunchine and success – everything is awesome. Below the waterline, struggle and suffering – all the stuff I bury & hide from everyone. Anger, stress, frustration, jealousy, competition,. conflict, loss, insecurity, criticism, failur, fear, etc. You’re not alone.

For the man’s life in 2010-2011, so much was going on in his business life, that everything was coming up roses. However, there were numerous items under the surface which was tearing his life apart.

Today, things are slightly different. He has a 4-year old child just like him, and a 2-year old child just like his wife. And, certainly being a parent is the most frustrating job which has ever existed. They are the greatest joy in life, but they are also the greatest trouble. 🙂 Its worth it though

Same Problems, Different Names

We have to learn to be human. You’re a real person, you have emotions. Let’s not hide the human experience, lets not sweep it under the rug (let’s NOT do this on facebook). Be Human with others, and you’ll get human back. SOmetimes its not always awesome, but it is real. There are too many opportunities to be robotic or inhuman. If you aren’t being human or acting it, you’re missing out.

What holds us back

Self defense, fear, ego, pride, shame, embarrassment, guilt… these things hold us back. In short, a superhero syndrome. That he may not want anyone to help him, that he could take it all on. The right people rushed in to help him when he let it out.

How to navigate the iceberg NOW

Its all about relationships and people. Those who rush in, while everyone else runs out. Those are the helpful ones. For us viewers, if everything in your world got turned upside down, WHO would you need? Things will go wrong. When everything hits the fan, who is there to help you make it through.

Your significant other- your first and essential partner. Your counselor- someone who you may not have to ask to pass you your favorite dish at thanksgiving.

My iceberg group

Safe group of like-minded, value-aligned people on a similar path. What’s the why? The learning, growth, accountability, support you need to keep you afloat. Its ok to have a uniform group #2, and iceberg friends that help to keep you afloat. I hate the term “mastermind group”. To get them, find those who are trusting and respect, confidentiality, no pillow talk. Learn and grow, not there to sit and gloat, and able to receive Empathetic support and not be jealous or judgemental. Empathy is not sympathy. its walking in one another’s footsteps without judgement.

Wysiwyg, shed the masks and costumets. Share the iceberg, the higest highs and lowest lows. Parallel stories offered, but not arrogant advice. More often than not, we want your story, not to be told things as advice. Give me the story and I’ll draw my own conclusions.

It starts with you

Be proactive and start herding cats. Start today. be open and honest, but have mutual trust and respect with CIA-level secrecy. There are plenty of support groups for problems which are specific, but not exactly one for LIFE.

Start simple and build from there. Dedicated meetings regularly. Monthly by phone, zoom, whatevery works. Once a year, have a retreat, and add new members.

If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together. THis has been tweaked to:

if you want to go miservable and lonely, go alone. If you want to go supported and happy, go together.

Success = 3 things you’re grateful for, and your support team.
Struggle = what’s holding you back, your fears, whats keeping you up at night or giving you heartburn

Cory Miller is a former newspaper journalist turned full-time entrepreneur. In 2008, he started iThemes, one of the first commercial product companies in WordPress, that now offers key products like BackupBuddy, iThemes Security and iThemes Sync. Named the 7th fastest growing company in Oklahoma City in 2011 by the Metro 50, iThemes employs over 20 people around the globe with headquarters in Oklahoma City. In 2011, he co-founded The Div, Inc, a nonprofit tech foundation aimed at inspiring and training the next generation of web developers through its kid’s program, Div Jr. He is the co-author of WordPress All-in-One for Dummies (Wiley, 2011) and is a member of the Oklahoma chapter of Entrepreneurs’ Organization, a network of over 8,000 entrepreneurs in 40 countries with companies that have revenue over $1 million dollars annually. He blogs regularly about entrepreneurship and career advice here at CoryMiller.com. He is married to Lindsey Miller, who is the Partner Manager at Liquid Web. They have an adorable son named Caloway and a little sweetheart daughter named Lillian.

LEA115: Habits of Successful Leaders

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Lead115This was hosted by Denise Lorenz and Deb Oronzio

Planning for Results Managing Priorities Creative Problem Solving

In the beginning, we rated ourseles on the 10 habits of successful leaders and the 20 bad habits of leaders. I was fairly happy with my results, but honestly it would take a fair amount of work and adjustment to quash these. If you’re interested in learning where you stand, try visiting our class examples at http://www.slideshare.net/bright9977/10-habits-of-the-great-leader

Part One: Assessing Your Leadership

leadership habits

The training hopes to introduce practical ideas and techniques for short and long term planning with an improved focus on results. We also seek to help define criteria for prioritization of your work and a system for managing to those priorities.
Introduce a five-step, structured process for problem solving in teams or groups.

Wake Tech Mission & Vision

The MISSION of Wake Technical Community College is to improve and enrich lives by meeting the lifelong education, training, and workforce development needs of the communities we serve.

Our VISION is to be a college that exceeds the expectations of our stakeholders for effective lifelong education, training, and workforce development by providing world-class programs and services. Wake Tech will structure its operations, training, and educational programs around the CORE VALUES of accountability, respect, responsibility, critical thinking, communication, and collaboration.

Part Two – Planning, Priorities and Problem Solving

Planning for Results

Types of Planning

  • Planning for Results
  • Strategic Planning in Higher Education
  • Wake Tech Mission and Values
  • Types of Planning
  • Obstacles to Planning
  • Planning for Results

Wake Tech Core Values

Accountability is essential for an environment of learning. Those who are accountable stand by their words and actions, taking full responsibility for what they create and for what they contribute to the community.

Respect is a prerequisite for enhancing learning. Community members who respect themselves and others help create a safe, yet open, climate of learning.

Responsibility is the root of success. Students who assume personal responsibility for their education will reach their goals. Responsible students also make contributions to their communities.

Critical thinking is the fundamental purpose of higher education. The ability to solve problems through the application of the appropriate skills is critical to all disciplines.

Communication is increasingly the key competency for living and working in the information age. Communicating effectively in oral and written forms through traditional and new media is a powerful tool for personal and career success.

Collaboration, by bringing together individual knowledge and talents, creates teams that are greater than the sum of their parts. Such teamwork maximizes benefits to individuals and the community.

Making the Plan Work

Leadership – Defining leadership roles and responsibilities. Creating a commitment to the plan.
Communication – Attention given to each affected group of plan to lessen resistance.
Assessment – Monitor plan’s progress and assess its outcomes.

Plan Process Considerations

  • Create a diverse leadership team to gain variety of perspectives
  • Foster readiness and shared sense of need for change
  • Gain historical perspective of previous planning efforts
  • Anticipate concerns and develop strategies to address them
  • Engage faculty and staff to ensure openness and inclusion
  • Identify needed resources

Obstacles to Planning

  • Lack of Awareness
  • Culture of Immediacy
  • Lack of Initiative
  • Fear Factor
  • “We’ve never done it this way before“
  • “We’ve always done it this way”
  • “What happens if we fail?”

Planning for Results

  • Develop a sense of direction and purpose
  • ID factors that affect the College
  • Understand circumstances contributing to past successes (or failures)
  • Coordinate efforts – include your team
  • Ensure availability of adequate resources
  • Develop “What If” Scenarios
  • Establish Performance Standards
  • Establish priorities

Prioritizing Your Time

A Guide for Prioritizing

Set 3 Most Important Tasks (MITs) for the day. If you could only do three things today, what would I feel the most fulfilled in doing?
Focus on providing value. How much value will this provide me, or someone else?
Think long-term. Will this make a difference a week, month or year from now? Five years?
A Guide for Prioritizing. First things first.
I will focus on completing my most important tasks early in the day so that if my afternoon gets busy, I can still finish the day feeling that I accomplished what I wanted to.
Have a clear vision. Is this activity moving me closer to my vision? Will it make much of a difference tomorrow or next week?

Meeting Management

  • Do you need a meeting?
  • Plan the meeting – Begin with the end in mind.
  • Select the appropriate participants.
  • Distribute agenda and work materials in advance of the meeting.
  • Begin and end the meeting on time.
  • Appoint a facilitator and time-keeper.
  • Designate follow-up actions with due dates.
  • Publish meeting minutes – including action items – within 24 hours.
  • For those with action items, work into priorities matrix.

Structured Problem Solving Process

  • Identify the stakeholders
  • Define the problem
  • Understand the problem
  • Identify solutions
  • Pick a solution
  • Implement the solution
  • Measure the results
  • Revise and repeat
  • Tackling Your Committee “Opportunity”
  • Define the problem.
  • Do you really have enough information for this?
  • Who would you need to involve? (A “committee” isn’t always the best option.)
  • To get creative, you need to get outside of the box – to get out of the box… you need help!
  • What information would you need to collect?
  • What do you already have?
  • What do you need to research / create?
  • Tackling Your Committee “Opportunity”
  • Once you have all the information you need – what possible solutions can you identify?
  • What will they cost?
  • How easy / difficult will they be to implement?
  • What will drive results?
  • Get in the way?
  • Tackling Your Committee “Opportunity”
  • Select a solution – build consensus.
  • How will you measure your results? (If you can’t measure results, how will you know if the problem is fixed?)
  • Plan your implementation:
  • Who needs to be on board?
  • What do they need to know?
  • What needs to be done to support implementation?
  • Implement, measure, evaluate and revisit.

Part Three – Reality

Managing Interruptions

  • The phone
  • The email
  • The “drop-in”
  • Contracts with your “significant others”
  • Boss
  • Colleagues
  • Students
  • Wrap-Up

    As a result of today’s discussion, what will you?

    Start doing?
    Stop doing?
    Change?