training

RISE Training!

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On 3/15/19 at 12:00pm, I attended the Professional Development Session RISE Training at the Engineering and Technology Building (SE 226) at Wake Technical Community College’s South Campus in Raleigh, NC presented by Scarlet Edwards.

Slide1

RISE Training

We learned about the new RISE initiative across the state of North Carolina. Scarlet Edwards will be teaching us. RISE is critical for fall advising. This is a mandatory meeting for Matt Henry’s team, and they were nice enough to allow me to join this professional development training.

Slide2

Completion Percentages: A Clear Look

One of the important things that we looked at was a clear graph outlining the completion percentages for students attempting college level Math and English in the first two years of college. The two courses were not significantly different, so we’re looking at the math numbers here. While numbers are increasing as time moves forward and we are offering more online classes in these, numbers of actual completions are still low. However, statistics show that students who complete these gateway courses achieve degrees.

It should be noted that 2014-2015 is when the multiple measure model was begun.

The college would like to see more students completing English and Math “Gateway” courses in the first two years. Many students are holding off on these courses, and then failing them so many times that they fail to achieve a college degree, or are forced to complete their AAS degree at another institution- we do all the work toward great training, and another school achieves our completion. We’d like to stop that.

By “Encouraging” our students to take these courses before other standard curriculum courses for our degrees, we will ultimately see more completions and student successes.

Instead of offering testing for students, a new system will place new students into classes automatically, and we should encourage our students to take these classes first.

 

A Healthy Debate

At this point in the discussion, there was a very healthy debate which erupted. Many faculty members voiced their opinions before everyone was encouraged to save questions to the end. This training is mandatory, and it is very important that every person has a chance to hear the information. I held my questions for the end, but the following points were made very clear:

  • One faculty member has been teaching for 30 years. They noted that ENG and MAT courses are important, but the job skills are more important. Pushing off things that you like (technology training) for things which you don’t like (math problems and english papers) will encourage more students to quit early rather than late.
  • Another faculty member noted that we would have more completers in the programs if we could have pre-degree requirements like the nursing program has. They have a 100% completion and 100% job-placement rating because they are able to cherry pick the best students before they begin. If we had this ability, we’d have no problems
  • A faculty member suggested that if we could expand our program to a 3 year degree program we could solve many of these problems.
  • Another faculty member stated that since neither Math nor English were Pre-requirements or Co-requirements for any classes within their program, there was no impetus to push this agenda. As student could get perfectly far in the program without facing any barriers to success.
  • Another faculty member noted that students who fail in a majority of the intro classes do so because the ESL (english as a second language) and EFL (english as a foreign language) students have passed ENG111, but still cannot read or communicate well. Those students have already met these requirements and already are on a road to failure. This program should start with ESL and EFL and then evaluate success before putting this to all faculty
  • One faculty member with over 20 years teaching noted that this system has not worked in the past and would not work. This was heavily agreed upon across the room, but since we hadn’t really heard the proposal yet, I thought this point was moot.
  • One faculty member was quite vocal that programming required a mathematical mindset, but did not require intense calculations. Taking the math class before buckling down toward making some headway in their degree would not help the student, but might detract them from any of the material.
  • One faculty member who had to take the gateway college algebra math class recently noted that the course was set up in such a way that unless you had taken the course before, your chances of completing it satisfactorily was nearly impossible. Unless, they noted you had already known the material of the course. It was set up so that those who knew the material would pass first time through, but those without intimate knowledge of it could be “thrown to the wolves”.
  • Eventually, order was restored with the interest of finishing in time. I took notes on my questions.

Slide3

NC Math Completions

These numbers on this slide were disturbing. One faculty member let us know that they told us the class was an issue, many people smiled politely. Based on population numbers, only 7% of African-Americans, 10% of Hispanics, Latinos, and Asians, and 14% of Caucasians pass a gateway level math course within 2 years of enrollment.

Lets take a look at the numbers for these specifically

Slide4

Gateway English Completions

Looking at other states, we see that there are similar numbers based on gateway courses. We see there are 2 specific options noted here: Gateway courses which require a pre-requisite class or classes, and Gateway courses which require a co-requisite class. In North Carolina, we require pre-requisite classes to determine whether students are ready or prepared for English and Math. We double-check this with compass testing.

Looking to other states, we see that several of them are using a similar system. Some have better numbers, others are below ours. These states, however, have seen a large increase and jump in completions based on the change from pre-req courses to co-req courses.

By adding in a secondary class— a co-requisite class— the states have found that they were able to dramatically increase the number of course completions. Some say that because students are able to continue working on ideas and concepts outside of class time.

 

Slide5

Gateway Math Completions

Again, we see the schools have very similar numbers to ours above. Again, when introducing the co-requisite courses, completions dramatically increase. These co-requisite classes are a bit like labs for science courses, or labs similar to language courses.

 

Question: Are these results accurate, or are they patting themselves on the back?

Answer: Good question. Our team visited schools in these states. They asked these same questions, and yes, these are the results they are seeing by the numbers.

 

Slide6

What Is Rise

RISE is the program in North Carolina which we will use to achieve a similar system. Durham Technical Community College is already using this system in North Carolina. We will be taking this system up in Fall 2019. We will use this information to help us advise our students and to get to know the system completely.

It is important to note that this system will be put in place to get our students into the English and Math Gateway classes sooner. Students who complete these classes in the first two years seem numerically to have greater success and completions.

Question: What if we find that students placed in these courses are not achieving these results?

Answer: Our intent with the RISE system is not to increase the passing rate. We are just using this system to allow students to get access sooner and receive concurrent support at the right time for the students.

 

Slide7

How Will Students Be Placed?

Compass testing was an easy requirement, but not every student tested well. And, the compass test will be going away. Moving forward, we will be using a new system based primarily on high school GPA. Based on a high school GPA, students will be placed in a column which will determine where students will start: Specifically, will a student be able to enter the gateway course directly, will they be required to take BOTH the gateway course and a co-requisite course, or will they need to take a transitional course?

GPA is the main determinate, but we can also see that testing scores on the ACT will also be taken into account. If students have scored well on the ACT score (within 2 points of the Target Score) of the particular category. Poor grades can be augmented by good test scores.

High School GPA is good for 10 years. If the result is over 10 years old, or not available, the student can pay to take the test for placement.

Slide8

RISE Placement Credits

In the new system, all of our pre-curriculum classes and requirements go away. Based on the high school GPA, students will receive some or all credits for transition courses.

Slide9

STAC Screen Need

Currently, we’ll need to use the STAC screen to see the credits given, as well as GPA and ACT scores. It was important to remember that the RISE system will not be in effect until the fall. Eventually, we will have a new screen called “XRISE” which will give use the right information.

 

Question: Is the ACT really this prevalent?

Answer: Yes, most schools use it now or encourage it. If a student does not have it, we may have SAT options available later, but just place them appropriately.

Slide10Slide11

RISE Placement

DAP Accuplacer is going away December 31st, if not before. Retaking the placement test is not allowed if you have high school GPA within 10yrs. Taking the test will cost the student money, and may take 5 hours. There are 3 sections of math (mastery tier 1,2,3) and 2 sections of english (mastery tier 1,2).

 

Slide12

Placement Test Q&A

In looking at the placement test Q&A, we ran into some questions about the placement testing. I’ll add them here:

 

Question: What if the student hasn’t received their official high school transcripts?

Answer: We can use an unofficial transcript to determine these courses.

Question: What if we have an army vet who joins and they don’t have a record?
Question: What if we have a student who school burned down/no longer exists/home schooled without GPA?

Answer: It happens. They’ll have to take the placement test and pay the fee. Some vets have been in the service so long that they have no GPA and have not undertaken any education, they take the test. Some old schools had paper records, and suffered a calamity or are no longer around, especially private institutions. Those students would take the test. Some home school students simply were not given grades. They also take the test.

 

 

Slide13

Co-Requisite Class Debate

At this time, there was another very lively debate. Many people had some loud and angry opinions. When the information was presented, it was given to us a very straightforward manner. This matter-of-fact information was clearly noted in an effort as if the presenter was trying to gloss over information. Eventually, the facilitator and the group head got people calmed down enough to continue. Concerns included:

  • One teacher with 20 years of experience who noted that this system would still never work
  • One teacher with 30 years of experience loudly noted that this would be impossible to keep track of
  • One teacher noted that some students would possibly be facing 9 hours just for math with a co-req, and 15 hours for math and english courses and their co-requisites. How will a student be able to start their education if they are taking 15 credit hours in the first semester?

After calming down, we settled on a few related questions.

 

Q&A Session

Question: Will the co-req grade count towards the GPA?

Answer: Yes, since it has credit hours, it will count towards student GPA

Question: How will the co-req count toward our degree credit numbers?

Answer: It will not be marked as a requirement. Students who are required to take it will have to do so.

Question: What if a student fails the co-req but passes the gateway class? What if they pass the co-req but fail the gateway class? What if they’re withdrawn from the pre-req class?

Answer: We’ll be talking about this later, but if a student fails the co-req class, they will be automatically dropped from the gateway course. However, if it comes down to the end of the course and the student passes the gateway course, they will still retain credit. If it comes down to the wire and the co-req is passed, the student will be able to take the gateway course a second time.

Question: What if the student chooses not to sign up for the co-req?

Answer: The co-req and the class will have to be signed up for together. They will be taught by different instructors. To sign up for one, the student must sign up for the other.

Question: What if the student stops going to the co-req class?

Answer: If a student is withdrawn from the co-req class for any reason, they will be automatically withdrawn from the gateway class.

Question: What if a student signs up for a co-req gateway because it fits their schedule. They are not required to take the co-req class.

Answer: Yes, that is true, but if they drop or withdraw from the co-req, they will be withdrawn from the gateway course. Students can opt-in to take the co-req but they’re under the same course requirements as other students. In for a penny, in for a pound.

Slide14

Gateway Transition Courses

Developmental classes will go away at the end of the summer. Since there is really only a single ENG111 transitional course now, any students in remedial programs should endeavour to take RED097 to get themselves to the ENG111 course. There are several transition courses for math, because there are several gateway math courses. In some cases, this can be very helpful, because any math class can be used for our degrees.

Pedagogically speaking, a better option in some cases might be for students to sign up for the gateway w/co-req on purpose.

Slide15

RISE Placement

Just a recap: the DAP Accuplacer is going away December 31st, if not before. Retaking the placement test is not allowed if you have high school GPA within 10yrs. Taking the test will cost the student money, and may take 5 hours. There are 3 sections of math (mastery tier 1,2,3) and 2 sections of english (mastery tier 1,2).

Slide16

 

Slide17Slide18Slide19Slide20Slide21

Advising Consideration

Students taking these classes will not have the same teacher for the gateway course and the co-req course. The gateway course teacher can take the grade of the co-req into account when deciding on a final grade for the course.

Healthy Debate #3

At the question about this, faculty had some very strong opinions

  • One faculty member asked to know what the criteria which could be taken into account might be?
    Answer: It is up to the teacher. They can take anything into account. Assignments, attendance, final grade, class participation, its all up to the teacher
  • One faculty member said that this sounded totally subjective, and some faculty members can take it into account and others would not?
    Answer: Well, it is up to the teacher to decide
  • If students ask the teacher and the teacher says “They will not take any other classes into account” can they change their minds?”
    Answer: Yes, it will be up to the teacher to decide
  • If the student no longer wishes to be in the class or co-req because the teacher is colluding with the gateway teacher, or vice versa, how will that effect them?
    Answer: leaving either class will put them in a new course and new co-req— the classes are linked. This wouldn’t be  good idea though, the new teacher may decide to take the grades into account and you’re right back where you started
  • So, if a student is getting an A in the gateway course, fully participates, and is leading the class, they could still fail or get a b,c,d,f in the class… totally at the teacher’s discretion
    Answer: Yes, the teacher can take the other class into account. If the student is not participating in the co-req classes, the gateway teacher could adjust the grade at their discretion.
  • Don’t you think this might cause a lawsuit? An A-level student can be failed or dropped massively because while they are attending all classes, the co-req teacher might feel a “D” is earned in one class and should be pushed into the other?
    Answer: Its possible, but they probably wouldn’t. But they could.

This seemed like it was going to be a problem. There is no official policy, its just teacher-decided material. Looks like it could be misused, abused, taken incorrectly, etc. The school is going to be on the wrong side of this.

Slide22

Optional Examples

Take a look at each of these examples and see where they should be placed!

 

Example 1: Kim

Slide23

Because Kim has a 2.8 GPA or higher, she can go directly into a Gateway course.

Slide24

Example 2: John

Slide25

John will need to take transitional math courses, unless he can complete up to MAT050 this summer. I’d advise John to track down his 2011 high school transcript (clearly not present), and to take ENG097 this summer if his GPA was 2.2 or less. This would get him into the ENG co-req in a single session.

Slide26

Example 3: Brandy

Slide27

Brandy can go directly into the MAT121 Gateway because while her GPA is less than 2.8, she has an ACT math score which is high enough. She can take the gateway course over the summer, or better still, just take a break. She’ll have to co-req ENG111.

Slide28

Example 4: Wheaton

Slide29

Wheaton is good to go with no co-req due to high GPA and ACT scores, if the ACT was in 2008. Otherwise he’ll have to take the 5-hour placement test. Wheaton looks super-duper young to be in his 30s. I think this was a plant.

Slide30

Example 5: Amy

Slide31

Amy has too low of a GPA to go into any gateway courses alone, but she has a high enough ACT in Math to get a co-req course. She’s applying for the spring, so if she can take MAT020 this summer, she can get into MAT110 in the fall. Similarly, if she can take DRE097 this summer, she can get a co-req english course.

Slide32

Example 6: Pete

Slide33

Pete can take MAT121 in the fall with a co-req. He’s got credit for the high level maths, so if pete can finish MAT010-050 this summer, he can skip the co-req. Instead, he should take DRE097 this summer and get into the co-req for english.

Slide34

Example 7: Chasity

Slide35

Chasity is looking at a co-req with math, but I don’t know the SAT scores… If she can complete DRE097, she can take the co-req with english in the spring.

 

EXAMPLE 8: Julian

Slide37

Julian can take DMA040-050 and not worry about co-reqs, and eng with a co-req in the fall.

Slide38

Example 9: Sarah

Slide39

Sarah should take DMA050 this summer and DRE098 if she can. This will save her extra hours and cost

Slide40

I felt this was good training, but I already had a leg up on most people. I worry that summer school numbers of courses offered will go down. There will be courses offered, but there will need to be a far larger number of ENG faculty on campus, and that means more rooms.

Since our departments do not really require these ENG classes or MAT courses as pre-reqs for our programs, there is not an intrinsic need for us to push these classes sooner. It actually seems to work contrary to our purposes to push these classes at the beginning, and instead better to shove them off onto the summer courses. I worry about the “taking in to account” vagaries in the language, and see a pretty hefty lawsuit. If one student sues, another just has to “think” that the work is biased in some fashion to have a legitimate case. Once a student wins, every student who was under the policy could have legal grounds for changes to transcripts, and compensation if their grades were not good enough to transfer to their college of choice.

Dangerous.

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Developing Faculty Mentors: The Low-Stress Option To Faculty Training

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At 10:00am On 11/10/16 I attended Developing Faculty Mentors: The Low-Stress Option To Faculty Training presented by Geni Wright at the 2016 USCA NDLW Virtual Conference.

Developing Faculty Mentors: The Low-Stress Option To Faculty Training

geni-wright
In her presentation, Geni Wright spoke on how developing faculty mentors modeling best practices for online and blended courses is an excellent resource for new and established faculty. Faculty mentors provide a long-term training strategy that is both cost-effective and user-friendly. Faculty are often more receptive to fellow faculty suggestions for course revisions providing collaboration opportunities and development of future training modules based on common concerns and trends. Faculty mentors have the additional benefit of ongoing professional development, interdepartmental interaction, and are often included in the planning and training for early adopters of newly adopted technology at the institution.

This discussion had no slide deck, so it seemed more like a free-flowing presentation with some off-the-cuff thoughts on the way through. Main topics were folded into:

  • Opportunities to enhance faculty training
  • The need for more effective peer to peer training
  • A way for faculty to model universal design in online and blended courses

Geni Wright discussed that her school contains only 175 faculty members at her school, and this required a team of 3 faculty members and a growing system requiring 1 faculty mentor per department moving forward. Faculty chosen for these mentor positions are ones using the universal design theories and practices in their classes. We need the faculty to facilitate and participate in the program are the ones who are showing the best use in their classrooms.

As a school which participates in Quality Matters (QM), faculty mentors participate in an internal peer review process to assist faculty in alignment for initial quality matters pre-review. Quality matters at their school is voluntary. I found this to be surprising. It calls to mind the idea that schools of small sizes have a lot to offer, but not always what is needed for larger schools. Granted, this goes both ways.

Moving into the latter portion of the session, the speaker discussed accessibility and objectives- issues we have covered heavily in our QM training here on campus, and moved into with EPIC. I was EXTREMELY surprised to find out how many schools are NOT ADA section 508 compliant with accessibility.

Some of this was not useful. A major improvement discussed was the use of Starfish, a faculty student evaluation tool, but the speaker mentioned that many teachers at her college were not aware of how to use the blackboard gradebook, and not all teachers did use it. This was extremely disheartening. However, not everyone can be the best, so there was a good deal to learn overall, just not a lot of it was for me.

ECGC: What Makes You Think YOU Know What A Leader Is?

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So you think YOU know what makes a great leader?!?

Went to the East Coast Gaming Conference Session: What makes you think YOU know what a leader is? as presented by Keith Fuller

In this lecture, Keith Fuller talked about leadership and what some of the qualities of good leaders were, and what was the major roadblock in the industry as far as leadership goes. He began by letting us know what his expectations of us for the talk were: that we would care , that we would participate, and that we would focus.

Leaders set the expectations for those they lead. And a leader, by definition, is responsible for the behavior, tasks, work performance, and development of one or more people whom they manage. The Jetsons boss is NOT leadership.

Leaders watch the quality of your work, and put you where you’ll be best used. A good leader makes you want to show up! The best leaders are approachable, and knows you as a person!

Leaders should not be pulled from a hat. “working ok” is not the same as innovating and excelling. Work should be lead to be efficient, not a “churn and burn” prfoile, because time you are spending at work is not time with the ones you love.

Quality of leadership can be most accurately seen through employee engagement. When and employee cares and is engaged, they work harder. When they are disengaged, they cost you money and productivity.

Quality of work as measured by the happiness of the employee can be directly noted through 2 main objectives: Their relationship with their immediate supervisor, and their belief in senior leadership. More often than not, you don’t quit a company, you quit a boss.

Consider reading:  “First, break all the rules” by Buckingham and Coffman.

If stuck down into  two main points from these hundreds of interviews:

  1. First, treat each employee as a person- know things about them and care about them
  2. Secondly, Don’t make leadership the default career path- great skills do not always translate into leadership, not everyone wants to become a leader.

Communicate, Relate, and Motivate.

Consider reading: “12 – The elements of great managing” wagner and karter

Good leaders have consistently good social skills, are impactful, value people, and objectively improves the business- doing so by supporting the people (arguably the most important part [supporting the people] of the group)

Biggest obstacle to quality leadership: the idea and pat response “We’re good.” (you are fooling yourself). Poor leaders and organizations that sponsor poor leadership feel they have no need to focus on leadership or improving performance.

 

Here was a good exercise:

You will get points for your organization (0-5) based on the following questions, Yes or No, 1pt a piece:
—————————————–

  1. You’re asked to give feedback about lead?
  2. Does everyone get regular 1:1 meetings?
  3. Performance review more than 1/year?
  4. Specific training in leadership skills?
  5. Does lead ask “how can I help you?”

 

Are you willing to give your score and NAME your company out loud? Some were willing to give their score out loud (About half). However, when they were asked if they were will to give their company name, it dropped to 4 individuals.
Problem: you are not willing to discuss this and name this in public.

 

What makes you think you know what a leader is? People are more open and will talk about taking notes in meetings, but NOT about what makes a leader.

WHY? Well, this could be a reputation issue that stops you from getting hired in the future. Many people are worried that the proud nail gets knocked down. What if you are the leader? Are you prepared to self-identify as a bad leader or to ask for help? We should encourage people to ask questions! Getting up to complain on a Soap Box is a bad idea, a 1:1 meeting is the right way.

GDA Lecture: Responsive Web Design, a Hands-on Approach

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On Wednesday, February 13th, Tyler Dockery gave an hour-long discussion and hands-on training on responsive web design to the FDA.
Learn about responsive web design with Tyler Dockery

GDA Lecture: Responsive Web Design, a Hands-on Approach

The talk outlined the basics of responsive design, how it differed from adaptive design, and was concluded with a hands-on demonstration in which students could create their own responsive page from a template [ code provided below ].

The Mac Lab was filled and several students remained without computers to discuss the materials and observe the lecture. Q&A after the session covered numerous topics, such as how to use media calls in CSS to reconfigure your responsive pages, and how to organize your content for mobile devices.

He provided two files for the discussion:

First, a word document outlining the basics of responsive design, and giving some great links to websites which students can use to learn more of responsive design basics. The DocX can be downloaded below:

Responsive Discussion Document

Second, a Dreamweaver file with a basic website already coded. Additional CSS has been added BELOW the HTML which will make the page adapt if the screen size becomes 600px or smaller. Cut the commented CSS and add it within the bottom of the <style> tag.

 As this version of wordpress will NOT allow .html files to be uploaded, AND .zip files with .html files insider are also banned, the entire source code will be posted below for those interested.


<html><head><title>Responsive</title>
<style>
body {
background-color:grey;
width: 1024px;
}
.container {
width: 93.75%; /* 960 / 1024 = 93.75% */
height:auto;
margin: 0px auto;
background-color: white;
}
.head {
width: 100%; /* 100% */
height:80px;
background-color: lightgray;
}
.nav {
width: 31.25%; /* 300 / 960 = 31.25% */
height: auto;
float: left;
}
.nav a {
display:block;
}
.content {
width: 66.66666667%; /* 640 / 960 = 66.6666666666667% */
margin-left: 10px;
margin-right:10px;
background-color: lightblue;
height:auto%;
float:right;
}
.footer {
width: 100%; /* 100% */
background-color: pink;
height:80px;
clear: both;
}/* Media Screens Below */</style>
</head><body>
<div class=”container”>
<div class=”head”></div>
<div class=”nav”>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
<a href=”#”>Link</a>
</div>
<div class=”content”>Whole biggity-bunch of content</div>
<div class=”footer”></div>
</div><!–@media (max-width:600px) {
.nav, .content {
float: none;
width: 100%;
Height: auto;
clear:both;
margin: none;
}
.nav a {
float: left;
margin-right: 10px;
display: inline;
}}
–>
</body></html>

If you’re interested in learning more about Responsive Web Design, please feel free to come and visit with me in my office, 321C in the ETB building. If you enjoyed this or any presentations, please let us know and let us know what you’d like us to present on in the future!