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You Too Can Learn To Teach On YouTube

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At 9:00am on 3/22/2018, I attended the presentation “You Too Can Learn To Teach On YouTube”, Presented by Brad Swearingen, at the 2018 North Carolina Computer Instruction Association Conference in At Asheville-Buncomb Technical Community College in Asheville, NC.

Overview

After getting started, we’ll talk about Brad’s recommendations. Brad mentioned that the reasons he moved to lectures on video was because of a duplication of q/a with students. They can quickly break down what they want to know, re-watch it, view only small sections, etc.

We’ll talk about getting started, managing your account, recording tips, whether you can make money, and of course resources to help you out. SO, to start at the beginning.

  • Getting started
  • My recommendations for hardware and software
  • How to open an account
  • Managing your account
  • Recording tips
  • Can I make money?
  • Resources to help you
  • Q and A

Benefits

There are many benefits to having YouTube videos. Let me outline those below:

  • Repetition
  • Retention
  • Perpetual Resource
  • Visual learners
  • Learn at their own pace
  • Read industry jargon on cc

Repetition

Having material on YouTube gives you the power of repetition which you can bring to bear. Firstly, you have the ability to reference the older material yourself in the classroom. This allows you use it as a reference and also to use it to recreate and update the materials you’ve posted in the past. Secondly, students can use the repetition to assist them. The repetition element allows student to watch and rewatch the entire video, pieces of the video, and pass the materials as necessary to others. Students will have access to the material 24/7/365. This gives them the freedom to view and review the material at their will.

Retention

Students find that the use of videos in the class increases retention. Students in online classes like the videos and video announcements because it gives a stronger connection to the teacher. Online students can see the teacher and their mannerisms, personality, and place a face with a name and a voice. Students in the online classes feel less disconnected to their class, part of a team, and less like they are being taught by an inhuman robot. This makes the students feel more strongly about being in the class, and retention rates are higher. Since students can revisit the videos (Above) retention rates are also higher because students can bone up on the materials that normally might trip them up. This keeps grades higher and allows students to feel more confident and more successful.

Perpetual Resource

Its no secret that things posted to the internet are never truly gone. The materials are available after the test, after the lesson, after the class, and even after graduation. The material can be shared, revisited, in some cases even downloaded. As a perpetual resource, students can find those after they’ve found their way into the workforce.

Visual learners

Some students learn by listening, others by hands-on learning, but many people learn visually. Visual learners are able to learn by watching, seeing examples, and watching videos. Video of course is a great way to show the actions you’d like students to see, they can watch the process of implementation or creation, and they can watch each step. Also, as noted above, the students can watch and rewatch, in whole or in part, any pieces of the process which can be problematic.

Learn at their own pace

Some students learn the first time, others do not. Some read slowly and others need to truly digest their materials. Video allows students to learn at their own pace and absorb the materials as the pace they need. Also, those students who retain the information better at night can watch in the evenings, some can watch in the mornings before work or travel, and any student can revisit the video material during breaks or downtime in their study sessions. Video truly allows students to study at the time and place of their choosing.

Read industry jargon on cc

Most teachers at Wake Technical Community College are steeped in EPIC, a system of accessibility and e-Learning compatibility with an emphasis on creating truly accessible materials. As such, all videos used in our curriculum are Closed Captioned for hearing impaired and subtitled even for those who are not. This is teacher-approved and NOT google-content. As the google content is often poorly worded, their teacher-made captions allow for accurate portrayal of the materials covered. While this is a win in its own right, it also means that our students can have access to Jargon terms in clearly defined type. No longer will students in the class room fail to know terms- OK, well, will no longer have an excuse for why they don’t know the terms provided in class. With every term outlined clearly, and transcripts available to our students to use as written notes, students have the ability to know and revisit industry Jargon so that they are not only informed and aware, but able to investigate on their own to deepen and enrich their own understanding.

My Recommendations on Recording Software

There are several options for recording software.

Many people teaching today use Camtasia. Camtasia is a great screen recording software which can integrate video, audio, and screengrabbing. For individuals, there is a $165 entrance fee, but many teachers have a campus license which can be used to install the material directly onto the computer as needed.

For those without those means, OBS is a fine solution. OBS stands for the Open Broadcaster Software, and open source software which can be downloaded from OBS PROJECT ( http://www.obsproject.com will open in another window). OBS project is free, easy to use, and offers a fine list of features.

My Recommendations On Microphones

Rather than describe each one here, I’ll just include the image with names and prices. You can look into these as you wish. Brad was speaking a little quickly, but the gist of it was quite simple: get the best microphone you can, and don’t make a bunch of hissing SSSS sounds and detonations of Popping P noises should of course be avoided.

I’m personally interested in getting one of those microphones which have the honeycomb guard over the mic. Guess I’ll have to be on the lookout on my own!

Easy vs. Easier

So what do we need to know about YouTube anyway? There are a few things to separate the easy from the easier methods of using it:

  • Easiest if you get a gmail account
  • Google owns YouTube
  • Lots of other goodies as well
  • If you have an Android phone, even better
  • If you have an Apple, don’t despair

The Process

I’ve done several videos on my own (about 40) so this process is fairly simple and understandable. However, I’ll outline it here for ease of understanding

  • Record your video in Camtasia or OBS
  • Edit the video if desired or needed
  • Remember where you saved it
  • Go to YouTube and sign in
  • Press the upload button
  • Follow instructions

Practical Advice

So what is some practical advice that you can bring to your YouTube endeavors?

  • Keep It Moving
  • Keep It Upbeat
  • Keep It Interesting
  • Keep It Short 5-15 minutes
  • Keep It To the point: don’t try to stretch out your videos needlessly to get your hours up
  • Keep It informative

Keep It Moving

Its easy to get bogged down in the minutiae of what we’re doing, and easy to pontificate and expand. However, for what our students need, getting down to the best parts is what we’re interested in. Keep the video moving with a good script, a clear timeline, get to the point and make it relevant to your content and your audience.

Keep It Upbeat

A nice, uptempo number is always well-received. Except at a funeral. Keep the video focused on how the students can do the work, how its an achievable goal, and how useful it will be in real-world application. Ensure them that it can be done in the time they have, and that they can revisit the links and rewatch as necessary. Don’t dwell on poor grades, but note common pitfalls, issues which could be avoided, and the important parts of each lesson. Remember, if you’re confident, they will be too.

Keep It Interesting

Don’t actually do this. Just kidding. Keep the video interesting. Remember, once a student decides their no longer interested in watching the video, it doesn’t matter how interesting it is, the video content is missed. As a result, keep the content moving forward and not only on pace but on script. Once you’ve lost them, you’ve lost them.

Keep It Short (5-15 minutes)

I don’t agree with this one. Personally, I listen to a lot of youtubers while driving to work. If the video is too short, Its not worth my time unless I’m in a rush. And when I want to learn, I want to learn the content. Students like to have short videos, often dropping off heavily in the 9-12 minute mark. If you have short snippets which are not lecture related, make it work for you.

Keep It To the point: don’t try to stretch out your videos needlessly to get your hours up

If you have a long lecture, and its not working for you, just divide that up into smaller segments. Again, if people aren’t listening, a long video won’t help. Remember, the videos aren’t for us, they are for the students and you need to ensure that the students are being served with those videos. Don’t tailor them to your needs, meet the student needs.

Keep It informative

Keep this material packed, and chock full of nuts.

Practical Tips for YouTube Videos

  • Market yourself at the beginning and the end
  • Say your name
  • Subscribe to YouTube channel
  • Like on Facebook
  • If you mess up, keep going and edit later
  • Use a good quality microphone
  • Save all your videos to the same folder on your hard drive
  • Stay logged in on your computer if you are the only user
  • Record in True HD or higher resolution
  • Add some energy to your voice
  • Add videos as often as possible: weekly

Final Tips for Success: 6 Easy Steps

  • Create a YouTube account
  • Record your video lessons
  • Upload videos
  • Create a Facebook page
  • Invite friends and students to like
  • Post your YouTube links to FB

Brad moved through this presentation in an efficient manner and pushing the basics of youtube videos with one simple motif in mind for the entire way: You can do it, and its easy enough to achieve.

No doubt, Brad uses the same methodology when creating his videos with a strong message, a clear goal and an underlaying message which can be easily absorbed and revisited: You Can Do It.

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Getting Started with Video

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At 1:00pm on 4/22/2017, I attended Getting Started with Video, presented by Jeff Jacobson, at the 2017 Wordcamp Conference in Raleigh, NC

Getting Started with Video

Why use online video?

  • Product demonstration
  • travel video
  • instructions
  • performance
  • vlogging

What makes a good video?

  • Tells a story effectively and efficiently
  • Good picture
  • Good Audio
  • Good Host

Effectively tell a story

Planning. Write a script. Storyboard your shots. Adobe Story is a fine program to assist building these out. Its clunky to write these 2-column scripts, but its very useful.
Editing

Good PIctures

  • Properly exposed
  • accurate colors
  • well framed
  • properly focused

Good Audio

  • microphone close to or on subjecyt
  • volument properly adjusted, microphone not “Clipping”
  • no extraneous sound

Basic Video Concepts

Field of view. How muc h of the shot can you see, and what does that tell us? Wide angles give the atmosphere, the short field is more personal.

Dept of field: How much is in focus? with shallow, the subject is in focus. A wide depth of field shows everything to setting mood.

Aperture: The amount of light let into the shot.

After a few minutes of this presentation, I honestly started having trouble focusing. The materials were extremely basic. I hoped to take a class about getting your offline business online, but that session cancelled. Important points like “Use a Tripod” didn’t really inspire confidence. Several people had fallen to sleep because of the heat and proximity to lunch.

Multimodal Strategies to Increase Student Engagement — League of Innovation Summit

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Multimodal Strategies to Increase Student Engagement 

The focus of this forum is to experience multimodal universal design strategies aimed at increasing student engagement. Formal student engagement directly increases student success and indirectly increases student goal completion. Participants will gain special insights through small group practice.

William Strond, Professor, Biology, Oakton Community College, IL

Many new online instructors initially create online courses that are fairly linear and mostly text. They quickly realize that such an approach would not work for every student, particularly those in  pre-college learning courses.

Many begin by writing lectures in a rather formal style, almost as though the pages were a textbook before they come to realize why it isn’t working. Teaching is an art, and not all people are very good at reading, and their engagement level is going to be fairly low, regardless of how much the content grips someone who loves the text.

Practical advice you can take to bring life back into your online classes using multimodal strategies:

1. Change the activity every 15 or 20 minutes.

Instructors in a traditional classroom can immediately see their students losing interest— but these cues are not available in the online environment, so estimate how much time each activity in you course is likely to take students and change learning modes when necessary.

One way to break up the content is by using videos, mp3s and screencasts created with Camtasia as a way of demonstrating the concepts presented in your lectures. In addition to engaging students in a different way, there are certain concepts that are easier to understand in this format. Realize that there are times when you as a teacher really want to show them how things go. Show them how you take main ideas from one assignment and apply them to one or more individual lesson items. This will make learning physical, and the making will deepen understanding among your students

2. Repeat the lesson in multiple modes to reinforce the learning. In addition to breaking up the monotony, presenting the same concepts in more than one mode can reinforce ideas and help students learn in ways that suit them best. Students may notice the repetition, but in a typical lesson it is possible to repeat the same information in three different modes.

A typical lesson might include a Web page, an animated PowerPoint presentation, and perhaps a video—so that you’re giving them the same material in three different ways. They may be reluctant to go back and read the Web page, but what they don’t realize is that in the three lessons they’ve gotten the same exact information three different times.

In addition to incorporating these various modes within each lesson, intersperse quiz questions throughout. If you’ve been telling students what’s going to be on the quiz, you can actually see the answers as you read or as you listen. Some students learn best with facts and when points are on the line. This acts as a motivator and shows that the quizzes are directly connected to your course content.

3. Create supplementary activities if necessary. Sometimes students fail to grasp the content immediately. In a face-to-face course, this lack of understanding can be remedied easily with a quick and simple review. Consider the same thing in your online courses when low quiz grades or other indications that students are failing to understand something. In these instances, consider  creating a quick Camtasia screencast and incorporates that into the next lesson as a review.

Design Blitz Raleigh: Design Panel Member

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On March 5th, Tyler Dockery was invited to attend Design Blitz in the Red Hat complex in Downtown Raleigh at the Design Panel as a representative of Wake Tech Community College.

Design Blitz Raleigh: Design Panel Member

As a panel member, I sat with architects and the video designer from Red Hat. The panel answered questions regarding architecture, graphic and web design, video and social requirements among other items. Students were very interested in software and packages, freelancing while in school, what kind of computers people respected or required.

Topics ranged across multiple tracks as time went on, and the feeling was similar to my first class teaching. Nervous? Yes. Energized? Absolutely! It is always interesting to know that your knowledge is more than just “satisfactory” when facing a room with 200 people in it.

After the panel discussion, I pressed business cards into the hands of several individuals and carried on individual discussions with 4-6 students. Afterwards, I was asked to return next year. I think this sounds like a great idea, and frankly I can’t wait.

Adobe Education Exchange: Adobe Certified Educator Badge

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Adobe Education Exchange Adobe Certified EducatorAdobe Education Exchange: Adobe Certified Educator Badge

“As a contributing member of the Adobe Education Exchange, Tyler Dockery has received visible recognition for his level of commitment and participation. Adobe is proud to feature a leaderboard function and badge recognition to members who’s mission is to serve the community of educators by maintaining a high level of activity.”

As part of my course on Digital Creativity in the Classroom, I began contributing to Adobe’s Education Exchange. In an effort to show milestones and fulfillment as part of this community, Adobe provides rewards and achievements in the form of badges. This badge was awarded for having achieved the rank of Adobe Certified Educator.

The Adobe Certified Educator certification shows that you have already demonstrated proficiency in Adobe digital communications tools, and have been teaching those tools for 2+ years (24 consecutive months without a break). Becoming a Certified Educator allows you to stand apart from your peers, boost your confidence, and expand your career opportunities.

At this time, it was verified that I had achieved Adobe Certified Educator Certifications in:

  • Visual Communication Using Adobe Photoshop
  • Web Authoring Using Adobe Dreamweaver
  • Graphic Design & Illustration Using Adobe Illustrator
  • Video Communication Using Adobe Premiere

Adobe Education Exchange: ACA Badge

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Adobe Education Exchange ACAAdobe Education Exchange: ACA Badge

“As a contributing member of the Adobe Education Exchange, Tyler Dockery has received visible recognition for his level of commitment and participation. Adobe is proud to feature a leaderboard function and badge recognition to members who’s mission is to serve the community of educators by maintaining a high level of activity.”

As part of my course on Digital Creativity in the Classroom, I began contributing to Adobe’s Education Exchange. In an effort to show milestones and fulfillment as part of this community, Adobe provides rewards and achievements in the form of badges. This badge was awarded for having achieved the rank of Adobe Certified Associate.

The Adobe Certified Associate (ACA) certification allows you to demonstrate proficiency in Adobe digital communications tools. Become a Certified Associate and stand apart from your peers, boost your confidence, and expand your career opportunities.

At this time, it was verified that I had achieved Adobe Certified Associate Certifications in:

  • Visual Communication Using Adobe Photoshop
  • Web Authoring Using Adobe Dreamweaver
  • Print & Digital Media Publication Using Adobe InDesign
  • Graphic Design & Illustration Using Adobe Illustrator
  • Video Communication Using Adobe Premiere