WTCC

RISE Training!

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On 3/15/19 at 12:00pm, I attended the Professional Development Session RISE Training at the Engineering and Technology Building (SE 226) at Wake Technical Community College’s South Campus in Raleigh, NC presented by Scarlet Edwards.

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RISE Training

We learned about the new RISE initiative across the state of North Carolina. Scarlet Edwards will be teaching us. RISE is critical for fall advising. This is a mandatory meeting for Matt Henry’s team, and they were nice enough to allow me to join this professional development training.

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Completion Percentages: A Clear Look

One of the important things that we looked at was a clear graph outlining the completion percentages for students attempting college level Math and English in the first two years of college. The two courses were not significantly different, so we’re looking at the math numbers here. While numbers are increasing as time moves forward and we are offering more online classes in these, numbers of actual completions are still low. However, statistics show that students who complete these gateway courses achieve degrees.

It should be noted that 2014-2015 is when the multiple measure model was begun.

The college would like to see more students completing English and Math “Gateway” courses in the first two years. Many students are holding off on these courses, and then failing them so many times that they fail to achieve a college degree, or are forced to complete their AAS degree at another institution- we do all the work toward great training, and another school achieves our completion. We’d like to stop that.

By “Encouraging” our students to take these courses before other standard curriculum courses for our degrees, we will ultimately see more completions and student successes.

Instead of offering testing for students, a new system will place new students into classes automatically, and we should encourage our students to take these classes first.

 

A Healthy Debate

At this point in the discussion, there was a very healthy debate which erupted. Many faculty members voiced their opinions before everyone was encouraged to save questions to the end. This training is mandatory, and it is very important that every person has a chance to hear the information. I held my questions for the end, but the following points were made very clear:

  • One faculty member has been teaching for 30 years. They noted that ENG and MAT courses are important, but the job skills are more important. Pushing off things that you like (technology training) for things which you don’t like (math problems and english papers) will encourage more students to quit early rather than late.
  • Another faculty member noted that we would have more completers in the programs if we could have pre-degree requirements like the nursing program has. They have a 100% completion and 100% job-placement rating because they are able to cherry pick the best students before they begin. If we had this ability, we’d have no problems
  • A faculty member suggested that if we could expand our program to a 3 year degree program we could solve many of these problems.
  • Another faculty member stated that since neither Math nor English were Pre-requirements or Co-requirements for any classes within their program, there was no impetus to push this agenda. As student could get perfectly far in the program without facing any barriers to success.
  • Another faculty member noted that students who fail in a majority of the intro classes do so because the ESL (english as a second language) and EFL (english as a foreign language) students have passed ENG111, but still cannot read or communicate well. Those students have already met these requirements and already are on a road to failure. This program should start with ESL and EFL and then evaluate success before putting this to all faculty
  • One faculty member with over 20 years teaching noted that this system has not worked in the past and would not work. This was heavily agreed upon across the room, but since we hadn’t really heard the proposal yet, I thought this point was moot.
  • One faculty member was quite vocal that programming required a mathematical mindset, but did not require intense calculations. Taking the math class before buckling down toward making some headway in their degree would not help the student, but might detract them from any of the material.
  • One faculty member who had to take the gateway college algebra math class recently noted that the course was set up in such a way that unless you had taken the course before, your chances of completing it satisfactorily was nearly impossible. Unless, they noted you had already known the material of the course. It was set up so that those who knew the material would pass first time through, but those without intimate knowledge of it could be “thrown to the wolves”.
  • Eventually, order was restored with the interest of finishing in time. I took notes on my questions.

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NC Math Completions

These numbers on this slide were disturbing. One faculty member let us know that they told us the class was an issue, many people smiled politely. Based on population numbers, only 7% of African-Americans, 10% of Hispanics, Latinos, and Asians, and 14% of Caucasians pass a gateway level math course within 2 years of enrollment.

Lets take a look at the numbers for these specifically

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Gateway English Completions

Looking at other states, we see that there are similar numbers based on gateway courses. We see there are 2 specific options noted here: Gateway courses which require a pre-requisite class or classes, and Gateway courses which require a co-requisite class. In North Carolina, we require pre-requisite classes to determine whether students are ready or prepared for English and Math. We double-check this with compass testing.

Looking to other states, we see that several of them are using a similar system. Some have better numbers, others are below ours. These states, however, have seen a large increase and jump in completions based on the change from pre-req courses to co-req courses.

By adding in a secondary class— a co-requisite class— the states have found that they were able to dramatically increase the number of course completions. Some say that because students are able to continue working on ideas and concepts outside of class time.

 

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Gateway Math Completions

Again, we see the schools have very similar numbers to ours above. Again, when introducing the co-requisite courses, completions dramatically increase. These co-requisite classes are a bit like labs for science courses, or labs similar to language courses.

 

Question: Are these results accurate, or are they patting themselves on the back?

Answer: Good question. Our team visited schools in these states. They asked these same questions, and yes, these are the results they are seeing by the numbers.

 

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What Is Rise

RISE is the program in North Carolina which we will use to achieve a similar system. Durham Technical Community College is already using this system in North Carolina. We will be taking this system up in Fall 2019. We will use this information to help us advise our students and to get to know the system completely.

It is important to note that this system will be put in place to get our students into the English and Math Gateway classes sooner. Students who complete these classes in the first two years seem numerically to have greater success and completions.

Question: What if we find that students placed in these courses are not achieving these results?

Answer: Our intent with the RISE system is not to increase the passing rate. We are just using this system to allow students to get access sooner and receive concurrent support at the right time for the students.

 

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How Will Students Be Placed?

Compass testing was an easy requirement, but not every student tested well. And, the compass test will be going away. Moving forward, we will be using a new system based primarily on high school GPA. Based on a high school GPA, students will be placed in a column which will determine where students will start: Specifically, will a student be able to enter the gateway course directly, will they be required to take BOTH the gateway course and a co-requisite course, or will they need to take a transitional course?

GPA is the main determinate, but we can also see that testing scores on the ACT will also be taken into account. If students have scored well on the ACT score (within 2 points of the Target Score) of the particular category. Poor grades can be augmented by good test scores.

High School GPA is good for 10 years. If the result is over 10 years old, or not available, the student can pay to take the test for placement.

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RISE Placement Credits

In the new system, all of our pre-curriculum classes and requirements go away. Based on the high school GPA, students will receive some or all credits for transition courses.

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STAC Screen Need

Currently, we’ll need to use the STAC screen to see the credits given, as well as GPA and ACT scores. It was important to remember that the RISE system will not be in effect until the fall. Eventually, we will have a new screen called “XRISE” which will give use the right information.

 

Question: Is the ACT really this prevalent?

Answer: Yes, most schools use it now or encourage it. If a student does not have it, we may have SAT options available later, but just place them appropriately.

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RISE Placement

DAP Accuplacer is going away December 31st, if not before. Retaking the placement test is not allowed if you have high school GPA within 10yrs. Taking the test will cost the student money, and may take 5 hours. There are 3 sections of math (mastery tier 1,2,3) and 2 sections of english (mastery tier 1,2).

 

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Placement Test Q&A

In looking at the placement test Q&A, we ran into some questions about the placement testing. I’ll add them here:

 

Question: What if the student hasn’t received their official high school transcripts?

Answer: We can use an unofficial transcript to determine these courses.

Question: What if we have an army vet who joins and they don’t have a record?
Question: What if we have a student who school burned down/no longer exists/home schooled without GPA?

Answer: It happens. They’ll have to take the placement test and pay the fee. Some vets have been in the service so long that they have no GPA and have not undertaken any education, they take the test. Some old schools had paper records, and suffered a calamity or are no longer around, especially private institutions. Those students would take the test. Some home school students simply were not given grades. They also take the test.

 

 

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Co-Requisite Class Debate

At this time, there was another very lively debate. Many people had some loud and angry opinions. When the information was presented, it was given to us a very straightforward manner. This matter-of-fact information was clearly noted in an effort as if the presenter was trying to gloss over information. Eventually, the facilitator and the group head got people calmed down enough to continue. Concerns included:

  • One teacher with 20 years of experience who noted that this system would still never work
  • One teacher with 30 years of experience loudly noted that this would be impossible to keep track of
  • One teacher noted that some students would possibly be facing 9 hours just for math with a co-req, and 15 hours for math and english courses and their co-requisites. How will a student be able to start their education if they are taking 15 credit hours in the first semester?

After calming down, we settled on a few related questions.

 

Q&A Session

Question: Will the co-req grade count towards the GPA?

Answer: Yes, since it has credit hours, it will count towards student GPA

Question: How will the co-req count toward our degree credit numbers?

Answer: It will not be marked as a requirement. Students who are required to take it will have to do so.

Question: What if a student fails the co-req but passes the gateway class? What if they pass the co-req but fail the gateway class? What if they’re withdrawn from the pre-req class?

Answer: We’ll be talking about this later, but if a student fails the co-req class, they will be automatically dropped from the gateway course. However, if it comes down to the end of the course and the student passes the gateway course, they will still retain credit. If it comes down to the wire and the co-req is passed, the student will be able to take the gateway course a second time.

Question: What if the student chooses not to sign up for the co-req?

Answer: The co-req and the class will have to be signed up for together. They will be taught by different instructors. To sign up for one, the student must sign up for the other.

Question: What if the student stops going to the co-req class?

Answer: If a student is withdrawn from the co-req class for any reason, they will be automatically withdrawn from the gateway class.

Question: What if a student signs up for a co-req gateway because it fits their schedule. They are not required to take the co-req class.

Answer: Yes, that is true, but if they drop or withdraw from the co-req, they will be withdrawn from the gateway course. Students can opt-in to take the co-req but they’re under the same course requirements as other students. In for a penny, in for a pound.

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Gateway Transition Courses

Developmental classes will go away at the end of the summer. Since there is really only a single ENG111 transitional course now, any students in remedial programs should endeavour to take RED097 to get themselves to the ENG111 course. There are several transition courses for math, because there are several gateway math courses. In some cases, this can be very helpful, because any math class can be used for our degrees.

Pedagogically speaking, a better option in some cases might be for students to sign up for the gateway w/co-req on purpose.

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RISE Placement

Just a recap: the DAP Accuplacer is going away December 31st, if not before. Retaking the placement test is not allowed if you have high school GPA within 10yrs. Taking the test will cost the student money, and may take 5 hours. There are 3 sections of math (mastery tier 1,2,3) and 2 sections of english (mastery tier 1,2).

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Slide17Slide18Slide19Slide20Slide21

Advising Consideration

Students taking these classes will not have the same teacher for the gateway course and the co-req course. The gateway course teacher can take the grade of the co-req into account when deciding on a final grade for the course.

Healthy Debate #3

At the question about this, faculty had some very strong opinions

  • One faculty member asked to know what the criteria which could be taken into account might be?
    Answer: It is up to the teacher. They can take anything into account. Assignments, attendance, final grade, class participation, its all up to the teacher
  • One faculty member said that this sounded totally subjective, and some faculty members can take it into account and others would not?
    Answer: Well, it is up to the teacher to decide
  • If students ask the teacher and the teacher says “They will not take any other classes into account” can they change their minds?”
    Answer: Yes, it will be up to the teacher to decide
  • If the student no longer wishes to be in the class or co-req because the teacher is colluding with the gateway teacher, or vice versa, how will that effect them?
    Answer: leaving either class will put them in a new course and new co-req— the classes are linked. This wouldn’t be  good idea though, the new teacher may decide to take the grades into account and you’re right back where you started
  • So, if a student is getting an A in the gateway course, fully participates, and is leading the class, they could still fail or get a b,c,d,f in the class… totally at the teacher’s discretion
    Answer: Yes, the teacher can take the other class into account. If the student is not participating in the co-req classes, the gateway teacher could adjust the grade at their discretion.
  • Don’t you think this might cause a lawsuit? An A-level student can be failed or dropped massively because while they are attending all classes, the co-req teacher might feel a “D” is earned in one class and should be pushed into the other?
    Answer: Its possible, but they probably wouldn’t. But they could.

This seemed like it was going to be a problem. There is no official policy, its just teacher-decided material. Looks like it could be misused, abused, taken incorrectly, etc. The school is going to be on the wrong side of this.

Slide22

Optional Examples

Take a look at each of these examples and see where they should be placed!

 

Example 1: Kim

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Because Kim has a 2.8 GPA or higher, she can go directly into a Gateway course.

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Example 2: John

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John will need to take transitional math courses, unless he can complete up to MAT050 this summer. I’d advise John to track down his 2011 high school transcript (clearly not present), and to take ENG097 this summer if his GPA was 2.2 or less. This would get him into the ENG co-req in a single session.

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Example 3: Brandy

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Brandy can go directly into the MAT121 Gateway because while her GPA is less than 2.8, she has an ACT math score which is high enough. She can take the gateway course over the summer, or better still, just take a break. She’ll have to co-req ENG111.

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Example 4: Wheaton

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Wheaton is good to go with no co-req due to high GPA and ACT scores, if the ACT was in 2008. Otherwise he’ll have to take the 5-hour placement test. Wheaton looks super-duper young to be in his 30s. I think this was a plant.

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Example 5: Amy

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Amy has too low of a GPA to go into any gateway courses alone, but she has a high enough ACT in Math to get a co-req course. She’s applying for the spring, so if she can take MAT020 this summer, she can get into MAT110 in the fall. Similarly, if she can take DRE097 this summer, she can get a co-req english course.

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Example 6: Pete

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Pete can take MAT121 in the fall with a co-req. He’s got credit for the high level maths, so if pete can finish MAT010-050 this summer, he can skip the co-req. Instead, he should take DRE097 this summer and get into the co-req for english.

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Example 7: Chasity

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Chasity is looking at a co-req with math, but I don’t know the SAT scores… If she can complete DRE097, she can take the co-req with english in the spring.

 

EXAMPLE 8: Julian

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Julian can take DMA040-050 and not worry about co-reqs, and eng with a co-req in the fall.

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Example 9: Sarah

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Sarah should take DMA050 this summer and DRE098 if she can. This will save her extra hours and cost

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I felt this was good training, but I already had a leg up on most people. I worry that summer school numbers of courses offered will go down. There will be courses offered, but there will need to be a far larger number of ENG faculty on campus, and that means more rooms.

Since our departments do not really require these ENG classes or MAT courses as pre-reqs for our programs, there is not an intrinsic need for us to push these classes sooner. It actually seems to work contrary to our purposes to push these classes at the beginning, and instead better to shove them off onto the summer courses. I worry about the “taking in to account” vagaries in the language, and see a pretty hefty lawsuit. If one student sues, another just has to “think” that the work is biased in some fashion to have a legitimate case. Once a student wins, every student who was under the policy could have legal grounds for changes to transcripts, and compensation if their grades were not good enough to transfer to their college of choice.

Dangerous.

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NCCCS A+GD Program Next Steps

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On 2/24/19, I attended the North Carolina Community College Fine Arts Conference Session NCCCS A+GD Program Next Steps at the Meroney Theater in Salisbury, NC moderated by Dr. Brian Morris of Catawba Valley Community College

Rather than a Professional development session, this was more of an Informal conversation. What do we want to capitalize on before we leave? Contact information will be a great step. Brian Morris will moderate and we can formalize and capitalize on resources.

We would like to bring the AFA back and increase the number of articulation agreements. We are tangentially related by adopting the ART track and GRD/GRA track. Where are these going to go? DME digital media technology program. Pasteup, Stat Camera are gone. Design thinking and UX is important now. Is it research, data analysis, storytelling? Is it software only? Managing this for articulation is important. AFA in visual art transfers, but our materials do not.

What should we discuss? Formalization requires contact and available people. We can decree today by consensus to be a group with standard boilerplate bylaws. Many people are on board. We want to talk about officers and facing the magnitude of challenges that the AFA faced. Creating the articulation agreements with universities may be difficult. CCP is difficult. We have a draft of the bylaws, and we’d like to get people together.

Does the A+GD degree name need to change? Does it mean what it used to mean? Are we media directors now? Is it digital Media. Having 15hrs of DME entitles you to a Digital Media Technology degree, and the other 50+ hours can be anything! To keep a healthy A+GD program means the needs must continue to move forward. We are working under old descriptions, but we are teaching the skills and methods we wish to teach. Do we want to push that? We find that there are formally 6 GRD Programs in the UNC System.

Articulation may be an issues if faculty do not have masters degrees in Graphic Design. There are some classes with UI/UX which need to be built and added. Some classes are still tlaking about pagemaker and/or coreldraw. These are topics to keep in mind moving forward.

Are masters degrees required? There are multiple degrees with BS, BFA, BA in Graphic Design, or Specialization in Graphic Design. Is business and marketing a good degree to complement the design backgroun? What ideas do we have to address this as a body? Graphic Design degrees are hard to transfer. Portfolios may not be good enough, or 4-year schools don’t want 2-year students. One problem is that the number of contact hours don’t transfer or run into the credit surcharge because they have the wrong credits. A 2-hour class cannot work, but it counts against the number of hours a student has taken which runs afoul of the credit max allowed for the “graduate in 4” system item for colleges.

Is articulation really important? The majority of some populations in some schools are returning 4-year students. The trouble is really the stigma of a 2-year degree holder. Keyword sniffers  block AAS in terms of employment. We are looking for 1-2 students a year. Maybe this is important and maybe its not as important.

What about private college relationships? some have made good deals by speaking with private schools in general? should we work to increase the deals we can make with other schools and examine those?

The idea of “stackable credentials” will be pushed in the future. Its really about the skillpath and job path that students can follow. Industry-specific credentials may be used in the future to out maneuver courses where they already have skills. How can we maintain the go-to credentials? A 4-yr school student who starts at a 2-yr school has a different track in mind. Where are our students going to go? We should focus our core strengths, and determine where we want our students to go and alter our classes based on that pathway.

We don’t want advisors to say “graphic design goes nowhere”. We want them to say “UNC-Charlotte will accept the GRD degree and here’s what credits you’ll get…”

What does this mean? We’ll need to meet once a year or so. WAKE TECH is close to the system office, and can make a nice meeting place which is centralized. The RTP campus outside of Durham is adequate.

Ms. Cobb of CVCC was then voted in as president. Mr. Compton of CPCC was voted in as Vice President. Ms. Holleran of CPCC was voted in as secretary. Ms. Cousar of CPCC was voted in as treasurer. These were all voted in for a 2-year term. At-Large members will need to be chosen. We’ll need representatives for at-large reps from 4-year schools and community colleges. We can continue this conversation during the wrap-up and also set some goals for ourselves and the conference next year.

We were then all invited to CVCC to visit the department and spaces. The meeting was then turned over to the new president, Ms Cobb.

brittany.holleran@cpcc.edu

 

PROCRASTINATION: FRIEND AND FOE

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At 5:00pm on 4/17/2018, I attended the presentation “PROCRASTINATION: FRIEND AND FOE, Presented by NATHAN SHUMAKER of Analog Data, at the 2018 East Coast Gaming Conference in At the Raleigh Convention Center in Raleigh, NC.

PROCRASTINATION: FRIEND AND FOE

Nathan Shumaker, Founder of Analog Data, came to talk with us about procrastination.

About Shumaker

Shumaker is an indie game developer who has worked with Solanimus Inc. for 3 years and has created his own working start up called Analog Data. He is a self-proclaimed “massive retro gamer” who loves programming for older consoles. He calls it: “Fun and Challenging”. He’d really like to see  a world where everyone can enjoy games together and not be competing all the time. He’d like to see each individual console taken at both its face and intrinsic values: rather than an open debate and competition pushing fanatically with which console is better or which franchise is better.

People (himself included) just want to enjoy games.

Procrastination: Friend and Foe

Shumaker began by questioning our assumptions: Is procrastination bad?

Like all things, he noted, there isn’t just a black and white, yes/no answer.

Speaking from his experiences with procrastination revealed some of the truths which shaped his ability to live, function, and work in a deadline-oriented field. Did it help him? Did it hurt him? The answer to both is yes.

The Role of Procrastination

On the surface, procrastination seems like its only negative. Procrastination is often described only in its negative formats: “Putting off for tomorrow what could be done today”, “avoiding important things”, “satisfying your wants while putting your needs at risk”…

Webster’s Dictionary defines procrastination as “the act of putting off or delaying something”.

What this definition does not touch on, is what if the act you are DOING is quite pleasurable? For instance, have you ever put off pulling a bandaid? What about homework? Instead of doing homework (which you didn’t want to do) did you do something great— like take a walk, play a game, enjoy time with a friend? If you received a great deal of pleasure from the acitivity, can you say you put off pain in lieu of pleasure? Doesn’t sound so bad now, does it?

Positives in Procrastination

Procrastination has several positives. It allows us to take breaks which saves our mental state. It allows us some breathing room so that we can decompress and return to a state of readiness. It gives us a break from anxiety, and allows up to make plans. It allows us to re-prioritize and arrive fresh for a job. But most importantly, it teaches us to work fast and effectively.

In school, we find at first that we are encouraged to work continuously. We are taught that slow and steady wins the race, and that we should put aside set times for us to work. As time goes on, many of us find that we want to work when we’re motivated, and play when we’re not. We manage and manipulate our time so that we work when we’re productive, and slack off when we are not productive or need a recharge.

For a large part of the population, that’s where it ends. Putting away a work-all-the-time mentality allows them to get a short break and know themselves. They have very small chunks of time set aside for relaxing mid-job, and a large chunk of time once everything is done. This doesn’t make any sense. After all this work, you’re keyed-up and frustrated, emotionally and physically drained. Most people want to hit the shower and be done with the whole day, you can only envision going back tomorrow to do it all again. Let’s imagine the opposite scenario: You have fun for long periods of time, and when the time is up, you move into a time where you are motivated by time to complete your work, and improve on it if time permits. You’re fresh as a daisy, and if you need to work longer than expected, you just do. If you finish early… you have more time to do what you want! its the best of both worlds.

Procrastination teaches you to work hard, work fast, work accurately, and understand that work done efficiently is done right the first time.

In The Workplace?

In the workplace, the slow and steady approach is really looked down upon. People are not looking for long deadlines with quiet periods where you are left alone, undisturbed. They want that work NOW. The turnaround time should be as short as possible to do things right the first time. You are expected to create those designs in a day, or by tomorrow at 9am, not the convenient 2-week deadlines you are wanting

For a procrastinator, a late night comes with the territory. An efficient way to complete 4 reports at once? Already been explored and it can be done. Lazy is another word for efficient.

A thorough background in procrastination can actually be a welcome addition to the workplace.

How Can It Hurt?

In ways you cannot even imagine. Shumaker spoke about his personal experiences with it and how he’s coped with it. He went on to discuss how we can do the same when you are in a rut. Procrastination can be very dangerous when it comes to anything in life.

Putting off work that you’ve never done before? Waiting until the last minute for pitch materials and presentations? Skipping deadlines and in-progress meetings during a sprint or a crash period? Deadly. Missing deadlines due to unforseen problems such as computer reboots, updates, vehicle issues, travel plans… Laundry…

Conclusion

In the design industry, I see a lot of the same issues popping up. I encourage my students not to be afraid, but I felt this was more of a cautionary tale of using your wits, delegating authority, and preparing for the worst. It would be nice if it were more about acceptance instead of a “ways to fix yourself” talk. On the other hand, you cannot have everything!