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Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) status in Introduction to Programming Using HTML and CSS Achieved!

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At 10:45am On 3/22/18 I attended the Certiport certification lab presented by Certiport at the 2018 NCCIA Conference located at Asheville-Buncomb Technical Community College in Asheville, NC.

MTA-Introduction-to-Programming-using-HTML-and-CSS-2018Tyler Dockery Achieves MTA status in Introduction to Programming Using HTML and CSS

MTA status in Introduction to Programming Using HTML and CSS Achieved!

I chose to attempt this exam because I felt I could validate the skills and knowledge to recognize and write syntactically correct HTML and CSS, structure data using HTML elements, and create and apply styles using CSS. Since I was trained on HTML in 1996 and certified with CSS in 2001, and had been working with HTML and CSS with clients for 18 years at this point, I’m familiar with their features and capabilities, and understand how to write, debug, and maintain well-formed HTML and CSS code.

The Official Breakdown of Subject Matter

Microsoft’s official exam page for this test: MTA EXAM 98-338 outlines the following fundamentals will possibly be covered:

 

Understand HTML Fundamentals (10-15%)
  • Construct markup that uses metadata elements
    • Script; noscript; style; link; meta tags, including encoding, keywords, viewport, and translate
  • Construct well-formed markup that conforms to industry best practices
    • DOCTYPE declaration; HTML; head; body; proper syntax, including closing tags and commonly used symbols; comments
Understand CSS Fundamentals (15-20%)
  • Analyze the impact of using inline styles, internal style sheets, and external style sheets
    • When to use inline styles; when to use internal style sheets; when to use external style sheets; precedence when using a combination of inline styles and style sheets
  • Construct and analyze rule sets
    • Valid syntax for the CSS rule set; selectors, including class, id, elements and pseudo-class
  • Construct well-formed style sheets that conform to industry best practices
    • Reusing rules and rule sets; commenting; testing on multiple browsers; web safe fonts
Structure Documents Using HTML (30-35%)
  • Construct and analyze markup to structure content and organize data
    • Table tags; h1-h6; p; br; hr; div; span; ul; ol; li
  • Construct and analyze markup that uses HTML5 semantic elements
    • Semantic tags; header; nav; section; article; aside; footer; details; summary; figure; caption
  • Construct and analyze markup that implements navigation
    • Image links; a; target; bookmark; relative versus absolute links; navigating simple folder hierarchies
  • Construct and analyze markup that uses form elements
    • Form attributes; action; method; submission methods; accessibility; input types and restrictions; select; textarea; button; output; option; datalist; fieldset
 Present Multimedia Using HTML (10-15%)
  • Construct and analyze markup that displays images
    • img and picture elements and their attributes
  • Describe the appropriate use of the img, svg, and canvas elements
  • Construct and analyze markup that plays video and audio
    • Video; audio; track; source; simple iframe implementations
Style Web Pages Using CSS (20-25%)
  • Construct and analyze styles that position content
    • Positioning, including float, relative, absolute, max-width, overflow, height, width, and align; inline versus block; visibility; box model, including margins and padding
  • Construct and analyze styles that format text
    • Font-family; color; font-style; font-size; font-weight; link colors; text formatting, including text alignment, text decoration, and indentation
  • Construct and analyze styles that format backgrounds and borders
    • Border-color; border-style; border-width; backgrounds; divs; colors
  • Analyze styles that implement a simple responsive layout
    • Units of measure; responsive effects with CSS, including viewport and media query; percentages versus pixels; frameworks and templates; max width

Conclusion

All in all, this test was well worth the time and effort. The materials covered had a good amount of in-depth knowledge requirement, and I was able to break through with a score in the mid 900s. It was a good challenge, and I felt it will be helpful to me to show students that the MTA exams are a fine choice to showcase their abilities.

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Microsoft Technology Associate Status in HTML5 Application Development Fundamentals Achieved!

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At 10:00am On 3/22/18 I attended the Certiport certification lab presented by Certiport at the 2018 NCCIA Conference located at Asheville-Buncomb Technical Community College in Asheville, NC.

Tyler Dockery Achieves MTA status in HTML5 Application Development Fundamentals

MTA status in HTML5 Application Development Fundamentals Achieved!

I chose to attempt this exam because of my knowledge of core HTML5 client application development skills that will run on today’s touch-enabled devices (PCs, tablets, and phones). Although HTML is often thought of as a web technology that is rendered in a browser to produce a UI, this exam seemed to focus on using HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript to develop client applications. I felt confident to take this exam, because I had a solid foundation of knowledge of HTML5 & CSS3, but expected some issues with JavaScript. Since I teach and have hands-on experience with these technologies and since I’ve been working in the field of web design since 2000, I felt I’d have a fair handle on this. While I did not have a ton of experience with Microsoft Visual Studio, I felt I could do well.

The Official Breakdown of Subject Matter

Microsoft’s official exam page for this test: MTA EXAM 98-375 outlines the following fundamentals will possibly be covered:

Manage the application life cycle (20–25%)

  • Understand the platform fundamentals
    • Packaging and the runtime environment: app package, app container, credentials/permission sets, host process, leverage existing HTML5 skills and content for slate/tablet applications
  • Manage the state of an application
    • Manage session state, app state, and persist state information; understand states of an application; understand the differences between local and session storage
  • Debug and test an HTML5-based, touch-enabled application
    • Touch gestures; understand which gestures you test on a device

Preparation resources

Build the user interface (UI) by using HTML5 (25–30%)

  • Choose and configure HTML5 tags to display text content
  • Choose and configure HTML5 tags to display graphics
    • When, why, and how to use Canvas; when, why, and how to use scalable vector graphics (SVG)
  • Choose and configure HTML5 tags to play media
    • Video and audio tags
  • Choose and configure HTML5 tags to organize content and forms
    • Tables, lists, sections; semantic HTML
  • Choose and configure HTML5 tags for input and validation

Preparation resources

Format the user interface by using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) (20–25%)

  • Understand the core CSS concepts
    • Separate presentation from content (create content with HTML and style content with CSS); manage content flow (inline versus block flow); manage positioning of individual elements( float versus absolute positioning); manage content overflow (scrolling, visible, and hidden); basic CSS styling
  • Arrange UI content by using CSS
    • Use flexible box and grid layouts to establish content alignment, direction, and orientation; proportional scaling and use of “free scale” for elements within a flexible box or grid; order and arrange content; concepts for using flex box for simple layouts and grid for complex layouts; grid content properties for rows and columns; use application templates
  • Manage the flow of text content by using CSS
    • Regions and using regions to flow text content between multiple sections (content source, content container, dynamic flow, flow-into, flow-from, msRegionUpdate, msRegionOverflow, msGetRegionContent); columns and hyphenation and using these CSS settings to optimize the readability of text; use “positioned floats” to create text flow around a floating object
  • Manage the graphical interface by using CSS
    • Graphics effects (rounded corners, shadows, transparency, background gradients, typography, and Web Open Font Format); two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) transformations (translate, scale, rotate, skew, and 3-D perspective transitions and animations); SVG filter effects; Canvas

Preparation resources

Code by using JavaScript (30–35%)

  • Manage and maintain JavaScript
    • Create and use functions; jQuery and other third-party libraries
  • Update the UI by using JavaScript
    • Locate/access elements; listen and respond to events; show and hide elements; update the content of elements; add elements
  • Code animations by using JavaScript
    • Use animation; manipulate the canvas; work with images, shapes, and other graphics
  • Access data access by using JavaScript
    • Send and receive data; transmit complex objects and parsing; load and save files; App Cache; datatypes; forms; cookies; localStorage
  • Respond to the touch interface
    • Gestures, how to capture and respond to gestures
  • Code additional HTML5 APIs
    • GeoLocation, Web Workers, WebSocket; File API
  • Access device and operating system resources
    • In- memory resources, such as contact lists and calendar; hardware capabilities, such as GPS, accelerometer, and camera

Conclusion

All in all, this test was not bad, but perhaps a little more vigorous than expected. The materials covered had a good amount of in-depth knowledge requirement, and while I suffered a bit with the knowledge of JavaScript and managing session states of the application, I was able to break through with a score in the mid 900s. It was a good challenge, and I felt it will be helpful to me in the long run.

Web Design Concepts Certification Achieved!

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Apparently, I was in danger of having my certification lapse (Brainbench certification is only good for 3 years). Taking some time here at the end of the semester, I revisited my notes and aced this certification. I was pleased to see that HTML5 and CSS3 questions were now part of this exam. Way to update!

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HTML5 Certification Achieved!

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I learned HTML initially in East Carolina University (ECU) and University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), emerging in 1994 with a minor smattering of understanding. In 2000, I took classes at the University of Georgia (UGA) to get HTML and CSS firmly under my belt. HTML5 is a new and emerging standard for web designer. Since I teach a little of this, my HTML5 learning has all been self-taught. Getting this certification is a reflection of study and understanding of the newest upgrade to HTML. So, I determined to get my certifications with BrainBench

html5

HTML5 Certification Achieved!

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HTML5 Certification Achieved!

My training in HTML started in 1996. Stop laughing. I didn’t use it much, finding it clunky and difficult to work with. Programs like Web Warrior used some of the first WYSIWYG interfaces, but their setup was basically put together to show you what you had done, rather than allow you to design visually. Later, in 2000 I got to know Macromedia Dreamweaver 2.0 and Adobe Golive, finding GoLive to be the better of the two. That said, I took training in Macromedia Dreamweaver to get to know it better when receiving my certification in Web Design from the University of Georgia (UGA). In all honesty, I used Adobe GoLive more often, because I simply couldn’t afford a full working version of Macromedia Dreamweaver until about 2005.

Well, a lot has changed between 2012 and 2005. HTML had upgraded to HTML5 some time ago, but implementation of it is still spotty at best. That said, we have classes that teach HTML5 and my grasp on the new items such as sections, articles, headers, footers, HTML5 video and HTML5 audio were tenuous at best. This will only become more visible, more popular, and more widespread as time goes on.

As such, I had decided I would spend some time learning about HTML5 over the last few weeks, and I felt my grasp on this was good enough to seek certification. I’m glad I achieved this certification in HTML5, but I’m more glad that I understand the core concepts and specifics about this new coding style.

Tyler Dockery is certified in HTML5 coding through Brainbench.com
Tyler Dockery is certified in HTML5 coding through Brainbench.com